Knole 4.5-mile deer park walk

Knole, Sevenoaks, Kent

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
The ice house in Knole Park was much used in the 19th century  © Peter WalkerSmith

The ice house in Knole Park was much used in the 19th century

The gallops in Knole Park © Barbara Taylor

The gallops in Knole Park

Knole Park on a misty day, where you can meet our famously fearless deer © Jo Hatcher

Knole Park on a misty day, where you can meet our famously fearless deer

The Cartoon Gallery showcases rare silver and royal Stuart furniture  © John Miller

The Cartoon Gallery showcases rare silver and royal Stuart furniture

Route overview

Experience the history and wildlife of Kent’s only remaining deer park, which has remained substantially unchanged since medieval times. This walk has been produced with the permission of Lord Sackville.

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route map for Knole deer park walk, Sevenoaks, Kent
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Front of Knole house - grid ref. TQ542539

  1. From the front gate of the house, facing out, turn left onto the drive. Follow it round and leave it by the second footpath on the left, which is narrow with a wooden rail set into the ground on each side. Continue to a steeply sloping metalled path, passing a brick-domed ice-house on the left. Please take care when encountering the deer who graze freely in the park. Although they might appear tame, please don't feed them.

    Show/HideThe Knole ice-house

    Ice-houses were designed to store ice in bulk for summertime use in the days before refrigerators. By the middle of the 19th century, most country estates had an ice-house, although the one at Knole is from the 17th or 18th century. When ice is packed together into one large mass, its coolness is held in and it melts slowly. It lasts even longer when it is protected by walls insulated by the earth. Ice collected in the winter could therefore last well into the next summer in the ice-house. People living on seasonal produce discovered that meat and other foods could be kept fresh by being packed in ice. Ice was not only used in the kitchen. Physicians used ice to treat fever and inflammation and even prescribed the swallowing of ice to cure indigestion. With the decline of country estates after the Great War, ice-houses fell into disuse and often became overgrown.

    The ice house in Knole Park was much used in the 19th century  © Peter WalkerSmith
  2. At the bottom of the slope turn left and walk along the floor of the big valley. Just after you pass the second path on the right, take the path up a small valley to the left. You can recognise this path by the cedar tree, which is on the far corner of the junction of the two valleys.

    Show/HideThe Gallops

    This valley, now called the Gallops, was formed by a river in prehistoric times. In medieval and Tudor times it was used for show hunts; visitors would place bets on which hound would reach the end of the Gallops first. Today you may still come across horses here (please take care).

    The gallops in Knole Park © Barbara Taylor
  3. Continue up this little side-valley until you reach the top of the slope. Carry straight on, skirting a small wood on your right, and you will shortly arrive at a road. Look out for ant hills: the bumps on the bank of the western side of the Gallops are nests made by yellow meadow ants and are an indicator of ground that has not been ploughed.

  4. Turn right onto this road, which is long and straight, and then almost immediately left and downhill onto another, smaller road. Follow it past woods, two branching roads on the right and views towards the golf course on the left.

    Show/HideFallow and Sika deer

    Knole Park has been home to the same fallow deer herd since at least the 15th century and home to some Japanese sika deer since the 1890s. They roam freely in the park and may appear tame, but please do not approach, pet or feed the deer. When they become too familiar with interactions with people, they can become dangerous to visitors, particularly small children.

    Knole Park on a misty day, where you can meet our famously fearless deer © Jo Hatcher
  5. When you reach a road running across, turn right. Walk along this straight road for some time until the landscape opens up and there is a junction with a similar road which joins from the right. Look out for the Chestnut Walk, whose trees might have come from the 18th century tree plantation you will see on the next stage.

  6. Don’t enter the gate, but take the steep path down into the bottom of the valley and then follow the line of the valley. Look out for the 18th century tree nursery. If you look closely, you will make out the grid planting pattern. At least some of the trees along Chestnut Walk, which you saw on point 5 of the walk, are likely to have come from here.

  7. After a considerable time, you will pass a quarry on the right with several larch trees. Take the next path on the right, going up past a spreading oak tree and back to the front of the house.

    Show/HideKnole House

    The central parts of the house date back to the15th century. Often said to be the largest private house in Britain, it houses the fullest collection of Royal Stuart furniture in the world, one of England’s two oldest portrait galleries and an extensive and very rare set of solid silver furniture.

    The Cartoon Gallery showcases rare silver and royal Stuart furniture  © John Miller

End: Front of Knole house - grid ref. TQ542539

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Easy
  • Distance: 4.5 miles (7.2 km)
  • Time: allow about 2 hours
  • OS Map: OS Landranger 188
  • Terrain:

    Approximately 4.5 miles (7.2km) along a mixture of grassland and metalled paths, easy going and rarely steep. The last part of the walk may be muddy after rain. Dogs welcome on a lead.

  • How to get here:

    By foot: the Greensand Way passes near the front of the house. Alternatively, walk from Sevenoaks town centre along Webb’s Alley, following any of the pedestrian signposts marked ‘Knole Park’ on the high street
    By bus: from surrounding area to Sevonoaks bus station; ¾ mile walk following pedestrian signposts for Knole Park
    By train: from Sevenoaks station, walk 1½ miles into town and reach the park via Webb’s Alley (see ‘by foot’ above)
    By car: M25 exit J5 onto A21. Park entrance in Sevenoaks town centre off A225 Tonbridge road, opposite St Nicholas’s church

  • Facilities:

    Car park, restaurant, shop and toilets at Knole House (only when open). Guided park walks available most days during the open season. For more information contact us: 01732 462100 or www.nationaltrust.org.uk/knole/facilities-and-access/

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