A walk in the park at Charlecote

Charlecote Park, Warwick. CV35 9ER

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
This coat of arms commemorates Elizabeth I's visit to Charlecote © NTPL

This coat of arms commemorates Elizabeth I's visit to Charlecote

Mary Elizabeth Lucy created this quaint playhouse for her grandchildren © David Lewis

Mary Elizabeth Lucy created this quaint playhouse for her grandchildren

Take a walk through Charlecote's parkland in autumn © Paul Smith

Take a walk through Charlecote's parkland in autumn

You'll always see the fallow deer on a walk through Charlecote's parkland © David Lewis

You'll always see the fallow deer on a walk through Charlecote's parkland

Pause for a moment and enjoy landscape and wildlife © NTPL

Pause for a moment and enjoy landscape and wildlife

Enjoy stunning views of St Peter's church in Hampton Lucy © Paul Smith

Enjoy stunning views of St Peter's church in Hampton Lucy

Henry is one of our pedigree rams in the Charlecote herd © Lisa Topham

Henry is one of our pedigree rams in the Charlecote herd

Approach the Gatehouse to complete your walk © Paul Smith

Approach the Gatehouse to complete your walk

Route overview

Take a stroll through this beautiful ‘Capability’ Brown-inspired landscape at any time of year. Our walk timings are based on a gentle amble and allow plenty of time to You’ll see our fallow deer and Jacob sheep and there are lovely views of the house in its riverside setting. Bring your binoculars and enjoy our wildlife. Charlecote’s parkland is open 7 days a week.

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Charlecote Park trail map
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: The Gatehouse, Charlecote Park. SP259564

  1. Start from the Gatehouse and walk towards the main house. The house was built in the 1550s for the first Sir Thomas Lucy. It was one of the first great Elizabethan houses and although it has undergone many changes, some of the original brickwork remains.

    Show/HideRoyal connection

    The coat-of-arms over the front porch commemorates the visit of Elizabeth I here on her way to Kenilworth Castle in 1572.

    This coat of arms commemorates Elizabeth I's visit to Charlecote © NTPL
  2. Turn right through the iron gates and walk between the Cedar Lawn and croquet lawn.

    Show/HideVictorian playhouse

    You'll come to the thatched summerhouse created by Mary Elizabeth Lucy in the mid-1800s for her grandchildren. Funds have been raised to restore the building and replace its contents and this work will commence in 2013.

    Mary Elizabeth Lucy created this quaint playhouse for her grandchildren © David Lewis
  3. Walk along the path ahead of you to the left of the summerhouse along the length of the Long Border. Go through the metal gate on your left to drop down into the parkland.

    Show/HideA landscape view

    On your left is a giant mown grass spiral ideal for running round (and round) if youve got the energy. The ditch and wall on your right is called a ha-ha. It keeps the livestock out of the gardens without using a fence. This creates an uninterrupted view of the landscape from the house and garden. Restoration work will commence here soon and children shouldnt jump off this structure, however tempting!

    Take a walk through Charlecote's parkland in autumn © Paul Smith
  4. Walk down the gentle slope towards the river Avon.

    Show/HideCharlecote's fallow deer

    On the opposite side of the river is Camp Ground where soldiers are said to have camped before the Civil War battle of Edge Hill in 1642. There is no public access to this area as it is used as a safe haven for the deer particularly when their fawns are born. We have hares living in this part of the parkland too. Why not bring your binoculars for a closer view.

    You'll always see the fallow deer on a walk through Charlecote's parkland © David Lewis
  5. Turn away from the house and follow the mown path along the river bank and round the edge of the park. Walk towards the waterfall.

    Show/HideWildlife on the river

    This waterfall or cascade acts as a dam to maintain the water level of the lake. The river habitat is a haven for wildlife from a heron poised motionless on the riverbank to a flash of blue kingfisher, its always worth pausing to see whats around. In the past the lake was used as a fish pond to provide fresh food for the house. Our livestock roam freely but will move gently away when you approach and pose no danger. Inevitably their droppings are present

    Pause for a moment and enjoy landscape and wildlife © NTPL
  6. Follow the mown path by the side of the lake for the short walk. Alternatively, bear left at the head of the lake to follow the Hill Park walk (an additional 20 minutes). The mown paths are easy to follow but there are no waymarkers, so do check your map. You'll rejoin the short walk at point 7, half-way along the lake.

    Show/HideCharlecote traditions

    The Hill Park walk crosses the stream over the bridge by the boundary fence and includes a stunning view back across the field to St Peters church in Hampton Lucy. Traditionally one of the Lucy family sons would have the living here as vicar.

    Enjoy stunning views of St Peter's church in Hampton Lucy © Paul Smith
  7. To continue the short walk, stay on the mown path away from the lake towards St Leonards church. To take the long walk carry on along the lakeside and bear right as you reach the boundary fence, continuing to follow the mown path towards St Leonard's church. You rejoin the short walk at the churchyard.

    Show/HideHistoric herds

    St Leonard's church was rebuilt in 1862 with the help of the Lucy family. Please note the gate into the churchyard is one way. It does not allow re-entry into the park. There has been a deer herd in the park since the mid 1400s. The Jacob sheep were brought into the park from Portugal in 1756 by George Lucy - the first flock of spotted sheep to be brought into England. The traditional oak fencing you see all around keeps the deer within the parkland the varying lengths of timber make it impossible for them to judge the height to jump out.

    Henry is one of our pedigree rams in the Charlecote herd © Lisa Topham
  8. With your back to the church, follow the mown path down the avenue of trees back towards the Gatehouse (point 9 on your map). There are toilets signposted to the left of the Gatehouse.

    Show/HideThe Tudor Gatehouse

    The Gatehouse is the best example of Tudor architecture at Charlecote. Most of the brick and stonework is over 400 years old. It was built for show rather than defence though and is now home to our local produce shop. The clock is Victorian and has undergone restoration to make it work again. Future restoration means that the chimes will also be heard again as they did in the past to encourage estate workers to arrive at work on time.

    Approach the Gatehouse to complete your walk © Paul Smith

End: The Gatehouse, Charlecote Park. SP259564

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Easy
  • Distance: 0.75 miles (1.2km), longer walks to 1.12 miles (1.8km)
  • Time: 40 minutes (can be extended to 1 hour)
  • OS Map: Explorer 205 (Stratford-upon-Avon and Evesham)
  • Terrain:

    A pleasant circular stroll along mown grassy paths. Buggy- and wheelchair-friendly. The walk can be lengthened in two places to 1.12 miles (1.8km), taking around an hour at ambling speed. Either take the Front Park long walk option or the additional route around Hill Park (see map). Do take care along the unfenced riverside and lake and ensure children are supervised at all times.

  • How to get here:

    By train: Stratford-upon-Avon 6 miles; Warwick town 8 miles; Warwick Parkway 8 miles; Leamington Spa 8 miles. Taxis available from all stations.
    By road: 6 miles south of Warwick on north side of B4086. Use postcode CV35 9ER for SatNav.
    By bus: X18 bus route, Leamington Spa to Stratford-upon-Avon (not Sun).
    By bike: Bike racks available outside Visitor Reception

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