Walking in the Lake District: Day two

Wasdale Head, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1EX

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
One of the stunning views that you will experience on this walk © Joe Cornish

One of the stunning views that you will experience on this walk

Some of the many visitors enjoying the fresh air © Leo Mason

Some of the many visitors enjoying the fresh air

A glorious summer's day at Great Langdale campsite © Paul Harris

A glorious summer's day at Great Langdale campsite

Route overview

Day two of this two-day walk, tried and tested by environment and travel journalist, Mark Rowe, takes you back across from Wasdale to Great Langdale in the Lake District National Park.

 

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route of the two-day walk from Great Langdale campsite to Wasdale campsite in Cumbria
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Wasdale Head National Trust campsite, grid ref: NY183076

  1. Return via Wasdale Head Inn and Sty Head to the shelter, where you bear right up to Esk Hause.

    Show/HideWastwater

    Wastwater was scraped out by glaciers at the end of the last Ice Age, creating England's deepest lake. The scree slopes down from Whin Rigg and Illgill Head, were created by the ice and erosion on the rocks and are now a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest. The lake is home to brown trout and char who thrive in its very low temperatures and extremely deep waters.

    One of the stunning views that you will experience on this walk © Joe Cornish
  2. Bear left to Esk Pike and follow the path on to Ore Gap, then bearing right to Bow Fell.

    Show/HideFixing the Fells

    Our footpath teams are battling against an unrelenting combination of factors: a path gets inexorably worn away by walkers, so hikers walk on the grass edges, which in turn become mud. Water then follows the lowest point, washing away rubble. Within months, the result can be wide scars on either side of a battered path. Public opinion also presents hurdles. Some people see a footpath in a landscape as an imposition, but these paths are not being laid down in a wild, untamed countryside. The Lake District has been shaped by man for thousands of years, as seen by the neat hedgerows and fields bordered by idyllic streams.

    Some of the many visitors enjoying the fresh air © Leo Mason
  3. At Three Tarns, bear left downhill via White Stones and The Band to Stool End and return via the field to Great Langdale campsite.

    Show/HideGreat Langdale

    The campsite at Great Langdale in its picturesque setting, is the perfect base for a huge number of walks, climbs and other outdoor activities.

    A glorious summer's day at Great Langdale campsite © Paul Harris

End: Great Langdale National Trust campsite, grid ref: NY287058

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Hard
  • Distance: 11 miles (17.7km)
  • Time: 6 hours to 7 hours
  • OS Map: Explorer OL4; Landranger 89 and 90
  • Terrain:

    Some steep descents and ascents. Were assuming youre comfortable with map reading and grid references, and can use a compass to put together your own walk, and ad lib a bit, following a path or feature that looks worth nosing around, rather than sticking rigidly to a route. PLEASE NOTE: the map provided is intended only as a rough guide, please take a map and compass with you and wear sensible walking gear.

  • How to get here:

    By train: 4 mile (6.4km) mountain walk from Irton and Dalegarth stations on Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway. (NB - greatly reduced timetable in winter).

    By car: Wasdale Head is reached from the main A595. From the south, turn right at Holmrook for Santon Bridge and follow signs up to Wasdale Head. From the north, turn left at Gosforth.

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