Randwick ramble

Randwick Woods nr Stroud, Gloucestershire

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
Take in magnificent views over the Gloucestershire countryside © National Trust

Take in magnificent views over the Gloucestershire countryside

Our series of short walks are perfect for a quick stroll and some fresh air © Nick Meers

Our series of short walks are perfect for a quick stroll and some fresh air

Simeon Henry Pearce emigrated to Australia in 1841 © Nick Meers

Simeon Henry Pearce emigrated to Australia in 1841

Route overview

This walk leads you through lowland beech and yew woodlands, with a section passing through some limestone grasslands, an excellent spot for seeing orchids and other special flowers of this area. Then, as you pass through the woods, you'll see a long barrow, thought to be one of the largest found locally.

  • Grade of walk: Trainer (all rounder)
  • Type of walk: 'Hidden Places', 'Flora & Fauna'

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route map of the Randwick Ramble in Gloucestershire
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Randwick Woods car park: grid ref: SO823065

  1. From the car park take the track (known as Robbers Road) that runs between the woods and the field until you reach a set of large boulders on your right. Turn right here, following the path around until you see a stile on your right.

    Show/HideRandwick Wap

    The Randwick Wap is an ancient village festivity, still in existence, but first described in 1893. The events started with an election, by crying the Mayor, with all votes carefully recorded in a poll book. The newly elected mayor presided over a feast, and then the villagers processed to the mayors pool where a song was sung by all. The mayor was then carried on a chair into the pool. Everyone then all returned to the cider houses for further merry-making.

    Take in magnificent views over the Gloucestershire countryside © National Trust
  2. Climb over this style into the paddock, where you can see a wide variety of limestone grassland flowers, such as orchids and twayblades. Walk down this paddock and follow the woodland edge to your left. This will lead you first down the slope then returning back up hill towards a millennium seat.

    Show/HideLong Barrow

    The Long Barrow was excavated in 1883 by Mr G B Witts and Mr E Witchell. They described discovering skeletons in a sitting position outside the main chamber and assumed them to be slaves. Further human remains, pottery fragments, part of a Roman horse shoe and worked flints were found within the main chamber.

    Our series of short walks are perfect for a quick stroll and some fresh air © Nick Meers
  3. Just above the seat re-enter the woods over a style. Turn right on this footpath and follow it until you reach the lowest point still in the woods. Then turn left and follow the path back up the hill, keeping to the right as it forks.

    Show/HideA new life down under

    In 1841, civil servant and land agent, Simeon Henry Pearce, emigrated from Randwick at the age of 20 and set up a new life in Australia as a butcher. This career was short-lived, but by 1847 he had bought land, built a house and was forging a career as a civil servant. He bought more and more land, which was profitably sold for developing fashionable houses. Pearce was the areas inaugural mayor in 1859 and twice again in later years. The municipality was named after his home village and the new church he helped finance was an imitation of that in Randwick, Gloucestershire.

    Simeon Henry Pearce emigrated to Australia in 1841 © Nick Meers
  4. When you reach a track running at right angles to yours, turn right, walking until you see a five bar gate. Here you return to Robbers Road.

  5. Turn left and follow Robbers Road. On your left you'll see a long barrow, thought to be one of the largest in the area. Shortly after the long barrow you'll come to a smaller path crossing the main track. Take the right path and follow it downhill.

  6. When you reach the bottom of the path, turn left on to a track running along the flat. Follow this track, passing by a five bar gate, and continue along the track until you reach a metal vehicle barrier.

  7. At this barrier you'll see the remains of an old quarry on your left. Follow the track uphill, returning to the car park.

  8. We hope that you really enjoyed this one-mile walk. The National Trust looks after some of the most spectacular areas of countryside for the enjoyment of all. We need your support to help us continue our work to cherish the countryside and provide access to our beautiful and refreshing landscapes. To find out more about how you too can help our work as a volunteer, member or donor please go to www.nationaltrust.org.uk

End: Randwick Woods car park: grid ref: SO823065

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Moderate
  • Distance: 1 mile (1.6km)
  • Time: 30 minutes to 40 minutes
  • OS Map: Landranger 162
  • Terrain:

    There are two stiles. The terrain is generally stony underfoot, with a short stretch across grassland. It could be slippery in places if the weather is wet. Dogs are welcome.

  • How to get here:

    • By bus: route 230 from Stroud bus station. Alight bottom of Ash Lane, 0.5 miles (800m) away from car park
    • By train: Stroud, 2.5 miles (4km)
    • By car: From Stroud, take A419 to Cainscross roundabout. Follow signs to Cashes Green and continue up hill to Randwick, passing through Townsend, and take Ash Lane on left for 0.5 miles (800m) to car park

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