Plas yn Rhiw countryside walk

Rhiw, Pwllheli, Gwynedd

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No one knows if the capstone of this Neolithic tomb was found locally © National Trust

No one knows if the capstone of this Neolithic tomb was found locally

The unusual old stone pig sty is a listed building © National Trust

The unusual old stone pig sty is a listed building

Although only created in 2000, the pond is already rich in wildlife © National Trust

Although only created in 2000, the pond is already rich in wildlife

Route overview

From a Neolithic burial chamber to newly planted saplings and a recently made pond, this walk offers a look at the old and the new in the countryside around the small manor house Plas yn Rhiw. 

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Map showing the route of the Plas yn Rhiw countryside walk
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Car park at Plas yn Rhiw, grid ref: SH237282

  1. From the car park cross the road and go along the track next to the greenhouse. This track leads through to the woodland.

  2. Go past the old millpond. Keep right at the fork and carry on along this path until you come out onto the road above the car park. The trees in this wood are about 150 years old.

  3. Turn left along the road for about 110 yards (100m). At the sharp bend in the road, take the track leading off in front of you through the gate marked Tan y Muriau. There's a great view from here across Hell's Mouth Bay and Porth Neigwl towards Cilan in the distance.

  4. Continue along this track, through the farmyard, and on to a way-marker to the left.

  5. Follow the way-markers along the narrow track up to the Tan y Muriau tomb. Find a suitable vantage point to get a good view over the wall of the tomb, which is about 5,500 years old. The burial chamber is on private land, so make sure you stick to the path, or ask the permission of the landowner in the nearby Tan y Muriau house if you want a closer look.

    Show/HideGrave goods

    The Neolithic tomb gives us a glimpse into past religious beliefs and practices. We don't know whether the capstone was sourced locally or imported from afar. Tombs like these were created for local leaders, who were buried with cherished or expensive objects such as axes and pottery.

    No one knows if the capstone of this Neolithic tomb was found locally © National Trust
  6. Follow the way-marker through the field and past a small cottage. When you reach the entrance drive to the cottage, turn right onto the gravel track. Follow this track for about 270 yards (250m) until you reach a wooden gate leading up to a house. Climb over the step stile in the stone wall on your left and make your way towards the small cottage of Frondeg. This still has its original layout with a crog loft, a sleeping loft over the half of a cottage furthest from the cooking hearth.

  7. Follow the way-marker into the forest. Look out for the cottagers' pig sty built into the slope. This is one of only three of this kind in Wales and is a listed building.

    Show/HideFrondeg pig sty

    The fact that such effort was made to build the sty shows the importance of the pig to the household. Pigs were slaughtered during November and the meat was salted to last the family through the winter.

    The unusual old stone pig sty is a listed building © National Trust
  8. A little further along the path, before you go down the slope into the middle of the forest, look out for the old Baptist well. It's on the pilgrims' route to Bardsey Island.

  9. Go through the gate and follow the track round to a galvanised shed, where our staff cut up felled trees. About 165 yards (150m) further on take a small path on your left, leading off the main track to the wildlife pond.

    Show/HideWildlife pond

    This pond is a haven for wildlife. Nine species of dragonfly and damselfly are found here, as well as a rare water plantain. This pond was created in 2000, following strong winds that destroyed a section of the conifer plantation. The only plants introduced here were alder, hawthorn and hazel: all the others have seeded naturally.

    Although only created in 2000, the pond is already rich in wildlife © National Trust
  10. Return to the main track and walk on until you reach the road. Go straight over the crossroads and follow the old road, replaced because of erosion by the sea. When you rejoin the road, cross straight over and follow the footpath back to the Plas yn Rhiw car park, where you began.

End: Car park at Plas yn Rhiw, ref: SH237282

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Moderate
  • Distance: 2.7 miles (4.4km)
  • Time: 1 hour 30 minutes to 2 hours
  • OS Map: Landranger 123; Explorer 253
  • Terrain:

    Mixture of gravel, grass, soil and tarmac surfaces. Fair amount of moderately steep slopes. Dogs on leads are welcome.

  • How to get here:

    By bike: NCN Route 43 goes within 3 miles (4.8km) of Plas yn Rhiw, see Sustrans website for details

    By bus: Pwllheli - Aberdaron route, see Traveline-Cymru website for details

    By train: Station at Pwllheli, 10 miles (16km), see Traveline-Cymru website for details

    By car: Take the A499 Pwllheli to Llanbedrog then follow signs to Plas yn Rhiw from the B4413

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