Porthgain to Abereiddi coastal walk

Porthgain, Pembrokeshire, Wales SA62

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Bricks were made in this building in Porthgain until 1912 © National Trust/ Nicky Middleton-Jones

Bricks were made in this building in Porthgain until 1912

Look out for chough with their bright red beaks and legs © Richard Allen

Look out for chough with their bright red beaks and legs

Once a place for industry, now a place for recreation and sport © Andrew Tuddenham

Once a place for industry, now a place for recreation and sport

Route overview

Enjoy some of Pembrokeshire’s finest coastal scenery while exploring its industrial past. The tiny fishing port of Porthgain used to export road stone all over the UK, while Abereiddi’s famous Blue Lagoon was once an old slate quarry. Ynys Barri (or Barry Island) is also home to a fantastic array of wildlife… will you be lucky enough to spot a chough on your walk?

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route of the Porthgain to Aberreidi coastal walk in Pembrokeshire
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Porthgain, grid ref: SM816325

  1. Walk along the south side of Porthgain harbour below the brick hoppers. To reach the coast path, climb some steps next to a white building. Take time to explore the granite quarry workings.

    Show/HidePorthgain

    Ty Mawr is the building in the foreground here; it was once Porthgains brick-making shed. Huge red brick hoppers provide a dramatic backdrop to the tiny harbour. Granite road stone was crushed and stored in them before being loaded into boats and transported across the UK. Today its a pretty village best known for its pub, caf├ęs and galleries, but bricks were made here until 1912, and granite road stone from the nearby coastal quarry was exported in boats to all parts of the UK until 1931. A pair of white pillars at the mouth of the harbour act as markers for small boats.

    Bricks were made in this building in Porthgain until 1912 © National Trust/ Nicky Middleton-Jones
  2. At a sharp left bend in the path at a field corner, the tower above Abereiddi comes into view. Continue on the coast path along a section of very dramatic, high cliffs.

    Show/HideChough

    Chough may be seen swirling up above the cliffs on sea breezes, all along the Pembrokeshire coast, at any time of year. Theyre part of the crow family but have bright red beaks and legs. Look offshore for seabirds like gannet and, if you're very lucky, pods of porpoise.

    Look out for chough with their bright red beaks and legs © Richard Allen
  3. Steps from here lead down to the tiny beach at Traeth Llyfn. Secluded and remote, the shore is completely covered by the highest tides. There can also be nasty rip currents so it's not good for swimming, just paddling and sandcastle building. Ynys Barri is a rugged coastal outcrop of hard volcanic rocks framed by a marshy valley which was carved in the last Ice Age. It offers super panoramas to Strumble Head with its lighthouse in the northeast and the peaks of Pen Beri and Carn Llidi (on St Davids Head) to the southwest.

  4. The coast path continues over open grassland to Abereiddi. Great care should be taken as you approach the Blue Lagoon. The views are spectacular but the cliff edge is sudden. The Blue Lagoon is a great place for diving and coasteering. The path skirts along the cliffs before zig-zagging down towards Abereiddi beach. Catch the Strumble Shuttle bus to Porthgain, St Davids or Fishguard, or continue walking inland for a circular route back to your start point.

    Show/HideAbereiddi Blue Lagoon and Beach

    The spectacular Blue Lagoon at Abereiddi is a flooded former slate quarry. Slate was transported to the harbour at Porthgain along a tramway. Quarrying ended in 1910 and the site was flooded by the sea. Ruins of quarry buildings perch on the edge of the cliff top, and the remains of the workmens cottages can be found behind the beach. In September 2012 the Blue Lagooon was the venue for the UK leg of the Red Bull World Series Cliff Diving Championship. The beach at Abereiddi is rapidly re-aligning after the removal of the defective sea wall.

    Once a place for industry, now a place for recreation and sport © Andrew Tuddenham
  5. Walk towards the car park and toilets. Follow the yellow footpath arrows up a short slope and pick up a broad grassy footpath leading inland. From here you get lovely views up the valley towards Llanrhian; this was carved by glacial meltwater during the last Ice Age. It actually continues for 2 miles (3.2km) out to sea along the sea bed.

  6. Cross a stile, cut across the corner of the field and head over another stile by a pile of rocks. Follow a wide track eastwards to Barry Island Farm.

  7. Take this track down to the road and cross to the other side, climbing some slate steps into a field.

  8. Walk straight across the field and go over a stile and along a hedge to a kissing gate. Follow this route back to Porthgain.

End: Porthgain, grid ref: SM816325

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Easy
  • Distance: 4 miles (6.4km)
  • Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • OS Map: Explorer OL35; Landranger 157
  • Terrain:

    4 mile (6.4km) circular walk or 2 mile (3.2km) from Porthgain to Abereiddi. Mainly level, grassy cliff-top paths. Some steep climbs and descents (height gain of 985ft (300m)), steps, stiles and kissing gates in places. Take care at edges and overhangs.

  • How to get here:

    By foot: On the Pembrokeshire Coast Path between St David’s and Fishguard

    By bike: The Celtic Trail, see Sustrans National Cycle Network Route 4, travels along quiet lanes 0.5 miles (0.8km) away from the coastline

    By bus: Strumble Shuttle bus to Abereiddi and Porthgain from St David’s and Fishguard (near the station) in the summer and a less regular service in winter

    By car: turn off A487 at Croes Goch, taking signs for Llanrhian

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