Gardens

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A great garden

Four centuries of good husbandry have made Blickling’s 55 acre garden one of the greatest in England.  It changes through the seasons and has evolved over the centuries to reflect different fashions.

The beginning...

Come and see our Orangery in the Spring.

In 1619, the fashion was for formal gardens with ‘knots’, forerunners of parterres. In the 1700s a more natural look was created with views through trees. The Temple and Orangery were added early in the 18th century.

...and now

Lord Lothian brought in Norah Lindsay, the society gardener, to create the garden you see now. Today the garden is managed by a team of five, compared to the 15 gardeners employed by Lord Lothian. 

Katy's top gardening tips for autumn

Katy, one of our lovely gardeners at Blickling

  • Begin cutting back herbaceous perennials
  • Take semi-ripe cuttings for next year; such as rosemary and pennstemon
  • Put down an autumn lawn dressing
  • Raise the cut on your lawn mower
  • Begin planting spring bulbs towards the end of the month. Don’t plant tulips until November
  • Strip the leaves off your tomato plants to encourage the last fruits to ripen
  • Sow sweet peas for an early display next year

Bringing our walled garden back to life

Broadland District Council are supporting the walled garden project © Antonia Gray

Broadland District Council are supporting the walled garden project

Over the next five years we will recreate a working walled fruit and vegetable garden based on the layout of the 1930s/40s walled garden, but which is relevant to the needs of today.
It is a project of regeneration rather than restoration and we hope that you will become a part of it, by becoming a volunteer, helping with a donation or simply returning to follow our progress.

Bringing our walled garden back to life

Work has begun on our exciting walled garden project © Antonia Gray

Work has begun on our exciting walled garden project

Over the next five years we will recreate a working walled fruit and vegetable garden based on the layout of the 1930s/40s walled garden, but which is relevant to the needs of today.
It is a project of regeneration rather than restoration and we hope that you will become a part of it, by becoming a volunteer, helping with a donation or simply returning to follow our progress.

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