Wildlife

A special natural environment

Nest of a meadow pipit © National Trust

Nest of a meadow pipit

The countryside of Brimham Rocks is a rare and valuable natural habitat for animal and plant life.

Local birds and animals

Dry stone walls provide shelter for all kinds of wildlife © Sophie Badrick

Dry stone walls provide shelter for all kinds of wildlife

The moorland habitat is rich in wildlife.

Owls

Keep a lookout © National Trust / Keith Chawner

Keep a lookout

Different types of owl live at Brimham Rocks. Tawny owls call at dusk.

Providing habitat

Encouraging wildlife at Brimham Rocks - a bug hotel and bird feeders © Sophie Badrick

Encouraging wildlife at Brimham Rocks - a bug hotel and bird feeders

A volunteer-built bug hotel provides shelter for small creatures.

Providing a breeding ground

Pheasant strutting around Brimham Rocks in its fine plumage. © northeastwildlife.co.uk

Pheasant strutting around Brimham Rocks in its fine plumage.

Pheasant is a long-tailed ground-nesting game-bird living on the moorland at Brimham Rocks.

Providing a feeding ground

Red kites are reddish-brown birds of prey who come to Brimham to feed. © northeastwildlife.co.uk

Red kites are reddish-brown birds of prey who come to Brimham to feed.

Red kites come to Brimham Rocks to feed.

Providing a living space

Red deer grazing on moorland, nibbling on bilberries, browsing on heather. © northeastwildlife.co.uk

Red deer grazing on moorland, nibbling on bilberries, browsing on heather.

Red deer inhabit Brimham moorland all year round.

Home for the rare and the common

Buzzards breed in the woodland adjacent to Brimham Rocks. © northeastwildlife.co.uk

Buzzards breed in the woodland adjacent to Brimham Rocks.

This commonest and most widespread UK bird of prey also comes to feed at Brimham Rocks.

Learning about wildlife and protecting habitat

The pond at Brimham Rocks is brimming with native wildlife © Sophie Badrick

The pond at Brimham Rocks is brimming with native wildlife

Bilberry picking at Brimham Rocks

  • A bilberry bush at Brimham Rocks © Lloyd Gregory

    Picking bilberries

    Bilberries thrive on high ground and heathland and do best in acid soil, just like the conditions at Brimha...

  • The dusky pink flowers of the bilberry appear in springtime © Lloyd Gregory

    How to spot them

    You have to be eagle eyed to spot the tiny fruit. Look out for pinkish flowers, and cup-shaped petals.

  • A summer sunset brings out the colours of the heather in bloom © Paul Harris

    When to pick them?

    The best time to pick bilberries is from the end of July until the beginning of September.

  • Bilberries are at their most ripe when they turn dark blue © Sophie Badrick

    Dark blue berries

    The crop is at its most abundant for about two weeks after the berries have turned dark blue.

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