History

How the Onslow family came to Clandon

Sir Arthur, the first Onslow to actually reside at Clandon © NTPL/ John Hammond

Sir Arthur, the first Onslow to actually reside at Clandon

The first record of the Onslow family appears in the 12th century. Years later Roger Onslow moved to London to further the family wool business. His son Richard entered politics, becoming known as the Black Speaker during the reign of Elizabeth I. His grandson, another Richard, purchased Clandon Park.

The Onslow family at Clandon Park (part 1)

Plantation heiress Elizabeth Knight who married Thomas Onslow © NTPL/Angelo Hornak

Plantation heiress Elizabeth Knight who married Thomas Onslow

The Onslow family have lived at Clandon Park since 1641. Following their move to Surrey, the family's political fortunes began to grow. So did the house and the huge estate that they built around them.

The Onslow family at Clandon Park (part 2)

William Hillier, 4th Earl, who restored Clandon © Hinemihi Collection

William Hillier, 4th Earl, who restored Clandon

Clandon suffered great neglect during the time of the 3rd Earl of Onslow. Then followed a restoration to its glorious past by the 4th Earl, William Hiller Onslow. All was well at Clandon until 1914, when war came to Britain.

The Onslow speakers at Clandon Park

Walpole and the Great Speaker, Arthur Onslow © NTPL/John Hammond

Walpole and the Great Speaker, Arthur Onslow

The Onslow family are unique in having provided three speakers for the House of Commons over the centuries. Before the recent fire these three men were celebrated in the Speaker's Parlour at Clandon Park.

Gardens

The bulb meadow was planted by the 4th Earl during his garden restoration

The bulb meadow was planted by the 4th Earl during his garden restoration

Get more on our gardens, from the great designers who worked here hundreds of years ago to more recent alterations to this ever-changing landscape.

Hinemihi

Hinemihi is the only historic Maori meeting house in the UK. The meeting house bears the name of a female tribal ancestor from pre-European times. Always referred to as she, never it, she was carved in 1880/81 in the shadow of volcanic Mt Tarawera in New Zealand’s North Island close to the town of Rotorua. Today Hinemihi lives with us.

The First World War

This section of the page features an image gallery, so if you're using a screen reader you may wish to jump to the main content.

Share