Things to see & do

Woodland homes

can you find the boundary stone in Durbans batch wood © National Trust

can you find the boundary stone in Durbans batch wood

The five small woods provide a rich variety of habitats.  Over 76 bird species have been recorded on the estate, 50 of which breed here.  Look out for buzzards, nuthatches, tree pipits and wood warblers.  These woodlands are excellent places to see bluebells and ransoms in the spring.

 

Hiding in the hedges

The rolling fields and hedgerows of Failand © National Trust

The rolling fields and hedgerows of Failand

The hedges, tangled with honeysuckle, bramble and dog rose, provide food and shelter for many insects and birds. The hedges are being restored and laid under the higher level stewardship scheme.  Look out for newly laid hedgerows.

Summerhouse ruins

Ruins which can be seen at the edge of Summer House Wood © National Trust

Ruins which can be seen at the edge of Summer House Wood

There are two ruined buildings which can be seen on the edge of Summerhouse Wood, close to public rights of way.  They are single storey 19th-century buildings probably built by the Fry family. One was marked on an 1883 OS map as 'Summer House'.

What a spire

The grand spire of Failand Church © National Trust

The grand spire of Failand Church

The impressive Failand Church, with its 120ft spire, was built in 1887 in the mistaken belief that a new road would lead to the area being developed.  A clock was added to the church in 1897 to mark Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.

Home Farm

Home Farm once the home of Agnes Fry © National Trust

Home Farm once the home of Agnes Fry

Home farm, next door to Failand House, was once called Failand House Farm. It was built in the 16th-17th century.  Agnes Fry lived at the farm in the 1930s.  She addressed a crowd at the end of the farm drive where an Oak tree was planted to mark the Silver Jubilee of George V and Queen Mary.  In 1937 another oak tree was planted, this time to mark the coronation of King George VI. There's a memorial stone to mark these events.

What's on

Three day hedgelaying course, Sun 1, 8 & 15 Feb.

Learn how to lay a hedge from start to finish on three consecutive Sundays. This course will introduce the practical skills of hedgelaying.

Walking

Network of accessible footpaths

There's an extensive network of Public Rights of Way and permissive footpaths. Pick up an Ordnance Survey map and come for a walk.

Don't miss

  • Great views out to Portbury Docks, the Severn Estuary and Wales beyond
  • Hedgerows and scrub attract a variety of butterflies and birds; look out for sparrowhawks and little owls hunting
  • A wide range of trees including mature examples of more unusual types including cedar, sequoia and cut-leafed ash
  • Den building in the woods and playing in the streams

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