Ickworth pink cycle route

Ickworth, Horringer, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk IP29 5QE

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
Follow the pink waymarkers on your cycle route © Elizabeth Thomas

Follow the pink waymarkers on your cycle route

Cycling through Adkins Wood © Mark Aimes

Cycling through Adkins Wood

See what you can spot in one of the ponds at Ickworth © Elizabeth Thomas

See what you can spot in one of the ponds at Ickworth

Enjoy the peaceful surroundings of the fairy lake at Ickworth, Suffolk © Elizabeth Thomas

Enjoy the peaceful surroundings of the fairy lake at Ickworth, Suffolk

Come and stay in the Round House holiday cottage, Ickworth © National Trust

Come and stay in the Round House holiday cottage, Ickworth

Sheep enjoying a magnificent view of the Rotunda at Ickworth © Andrew Butler

Sheep enjoying a magnificent view of the Rotunda at Ickworth

Lownde Wood © Dom Kiddell

Lownde Wood

The obelisk is 100ft high and erected on the highest point of Ickworth Park © NTPL/Dom Kiddell

The obelisk is 100ft high and erected on the highest point of Ickworth Park

A collision during tank training in the 2nd WW damaged this iron gate pier © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas

A collision during tank training in the 2nd WW damaged this iron gate pier

This 2nd World  War 'Dig for Victory' land was once parkland © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas

This 2nd World War 'Dig for Victory' land was once parkland

Look out for the collapsed dam on your way round the estate at Ickworth © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas

Look out for the collapsed dam on your way round the estate at Ickworth

Imagine having to carry the ice from here to the house? © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas

Imagine having to carry the ice from here to the house?

Ickworth Dower House was lived in by the Herveys from 1702 until 1829 © NTPL/National Trust

Ickworth Dower House was lived in by the Herveys from 1702 until 1829

Route overview

A long circular route heading towards the monument at the southern end of the park, taking in most of the perimeter of the estate with some spectacular views of the Rotunda.

The route is extremely well waymarked but there is always plenty of opportunity to explore other tracks and paths as you go round.

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Ickworth pink cycle route map v2
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Ickworth main car park, grid ref: TL810610

  1. This cycle route is very well waymarked. Bringing your own bikes, start from the main car park. and proceed back down the main drive towards the main gates and Horringer village.

    Show/HidePink waymakers

    Follow the pink waymarkers which you'll find on all the junctions and at regular points along the route.

    Follow the pink waymarkers on your cycle route © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas
  2. Just before you reach the main gates, turn right off the drive and follow the pink waymaker through the gate into Adkins Wood. Cycle through the wood and at the next junction continue straight on, following the pink waymarker. At the next junction, again continue straight on. If you look right here, you'll find information on tree tags and tree health inspections.

    Cycling through Adkins Wood © NTPL/Mark Aimes
  3. When you arrive at Fontainebleau Grove, turn right and then follow the path to the left. As you cycle through the wood, look right at two small ponds which have some dead wood in them, excellent habitat for insects and pond life.

    Show/HideHabitat

    Small ponds like this are a real haven for wildlife. A great habitat for frog and toad spawn and even a drinking hole for the deer, rabbits and badgers

    See what you can spot in one of the ponds at Ickworth © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas
  4. Turn right at the entrance for Lady Hervey's Wood and follow the route with arable land to your right and the wood to your left. You'll catch a glimpse of the Rotunda to your right. Turn left at the end of the field and continue past the Fairy Lake.

    Show/HideFairy Lake

    Constructed in the late 19th-century by damming the river Linnet. It was originally much larger but the reeds have gradually taken over and it's been encroached upon by trees, notably Silver Birch. On the bank a few yards to the side are the remains, barely visible, of a small boathouse used by the Hervey Family.

    Enjoy the peaceful surroundings of the fairy lake at Ickworth, Suffolk © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas
  5. You'll pass the Round House, a National Trust holiday cottage, on your right. Shortly after the Round House, turn right at the sign for Lady Katharine's Wood over the wooden boarding covering a ditch. As you cycle through the wood you'll see mostly evergreen trees on your left and deciduous on your right.

    Show/HideRound House

    The house is indeed perfectly round. It was built in 1850 and used as a gamekeeper's house intended as a shelter for shooting parties. The Round House is situated in an idyllic woodland glade and is available as a holiday let (direction 5).

    Come and stay in the Round House holiday cottage, Ickworth © NTPL/National Trust
  6. Continue to follow the pink waymarkers and look out for charcoal burning in process. Charcoal is sold on the estate. At the end of Lady Katharine's Wood, turn right back out into the open. Look right for a fabulous view of the Rotunda.

    Show/HideTake a look

    There are many magnificent views of the park and the distant Rotunda, all deliberately built into its astonishing design. So as you meander in and out of forest tracks take a take a moment to drink in the view. Why not take a picnic with you and choose your spot?

    Sheep enjoying a magnificent view of the Rotunda at Ickworth © NTPL/Andrew Butler
  7. Bear right into Lownde Wood, keeping the edge of the woodland on your right.

    Show/HideLownde Wood

    Lownde means grave and is based on an old Norse word 'lundr' and is Ickworth's largest and most important area of woodland dating back to 1585. It supports a wide variety of flora and fauna

    Lownde Wood © NTPL/Dom Kiddell
  8. As you cycle along the route, take a look at the Monument on your left, erected in 1817 and dedicated to the 4th Earl of Bristol. Follow the route round a sharp left hand bend hugging the monument field. The path can get a little narrow in places here but continue to follow the pink waymarkers through the wood.

    Show/HideMonument

    The monument was commissioned by the 5th Earl and erected 1817 in memory of the 4th Earl, the Bishop of Derry by grateful parishioners from his estate in Derry. It was said that, to the anger of the King, he allowed Roman Catholic Mass to be held in his property at a time when this was illegal. The obelisk is 100ft high and made of Ketton stone and is erected on the highest point in the park.

    The obelisk is 100ft high and erected on the highest point of Ickworth Park © NTPL/Dom Kiddell
  9. Exit out of Lownde Wood and turn right through iron gate posts. Pass Downter's Wood on the right and Stoney Hill Wood on your left. Follow the road round to open countryside and down a steep hill, which is known as Stoney Hill.

    Show/HideIron gates and Stoney Hill

    The ornate iron gate piers were damaged by tank training in the Second World War. They are positioned on the ancient road into Bury St Edmunds that was forcibly closed in 1823 by a lake that was created to prevent locals going through the park.

    A collision during tank training in the 2nd WW damaged this iron gate pier © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas
  10. Continue on down to the bottom of the hill and a cattle grid.

    Show/HideDig for Victory farmland

    The land on the left next to this section of the route from down Stoney Hill was ploughed up for Dig for Victory during World War 2. The farmland is now tenanted and continues to be working land.

    This 2nd World  War 'Dig for Victory' land was once parkland © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas
  11. Go over the cattle grid and turn left on to the pathway. Go past the White House on your left and through the gateway. Continue through the next gateway onto open fields. At the next gateway, opposite Mordaboys Cottage, turn right and proceed up the hill.

    Show/HideAlbana Wood

    Looking to your right you can see the Albana wood, and furher on after 500 metres or so, you will see the remains of this old bridge. The bridge was constructed in 1823, but was poorly constructed and collapsed in 1842

    Look out for the collapsed dam on your way round the estate at Ickworth © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas
  12. At the top of the hill turn sharp right and in a field to your right are the remains of the Ice House.

    Show/HideIce House

    You'll need to walk a little way into the field to see the ice house. Now derelict, it has not been used since Victorian times. It was placed in an existing pit and was designed to take ice from the lake that was created to close the road

    Imagine having to carry the ice from here to the house? © NTPL/Elizabeth Thomas
  13. You will now be on a tarmac road. Continue past the Dower House on your right and follow the road back to the main car park.

    Show/HideIckworth Dower House

    The Dower House is now known as the Lodge at Ickworth and is part of the Ickworth Hotel. The Hervey family owned the estate from the 15th Century, residing in Ickworth Hall, a Tudor manor house which was demolished in about 1702. Thereafter the family moved to the Lodge (The Dower House), until 1829, when the new Ickworth House was habitable having commenced construction in 1795, although not finally completed until 1841

    Ickworth Dower House was lived in by the Herveys from 1702 until 1829 © NTPL/National Trust

End: Ickworth main car park, grid ref: TL810610

  • Trail: Cycling
  • Grade: Moderate
  • Distance: 6.75 miles (10.8km)
  • Time: 1 hour
  • OS Map: Landranger 155
  • Terrain:

    Path is mostly woodland floor, with roots and grassland, some gates. Will be very muddy after rain.

  • How to get here:

    On foot: 4.5 miles (7.2km) via footpaths from Bury St Edmunds

    By bike: Just off Route 51, which goes through Bury St Edmunds. See Sustrans website

    By bus: Burtons 344/5, Bury St Edmunds to Haverhill route, passing close to Bury St Edmunds Railway Station

    By train: Bury St Edmunds 3 miles (4.8km), then taxi or bus to Horringer and Ickworth

    By road: In Horringer, 3 miles (4.8km) south-west of Bury St Edmunds on the west side of A143. Signposted as Westley from A14, junction 42

  • Facilities:

    • Car Park
    • Food and drink: West Wing restaurant, Porter's Lodge Outdoor Cafe
    • WC's : West Wing basement, new facility in car park, and near the Bothy
    • NT Gift shop
    • Second-hand book shop (in West Wing basement)
    • New plant and garden shop in car park
    • Children's play area

     

  • Contact us