History

Discover the process of bread making from seed to oven at Clyston Mill © M. Jarvis

Discover the process of bread making from seed to oven at Clyston Mill

Clyston stories

Clyston Mill was a busy and noisy place from harvest through to spring. Grain arrived by the wagon load, to be milled after the millers had haggled over prices with the farmers bringing their wheat.

Water from the River Clyst turned the waterwheel to drive the machinery. Two pairs of French burr millstones ground fine flour, while another pair of millstones made of millstone grit could be used for the coarser milling of animal feed. The mill has been restored to full working order by the National Trust.

Ancient mills at Clyston

Clyston Mill as it stands currently on the Killerton estate

Clyston Mill as it stands currently on the Killerton estate

In 1086 the Domesday Book included an entry for a mill at ‘Clystona’. Cliston was the old name of Broadclyst. The mill was worth 20 shillings, or £1, a year. The current mill, thought to have been built in the early 19th century, possibly occupies the same site.

16th century to 1661

Grist mills are buildings where grain is ground down into flour © Malcolm Jarvis

There were 'twoe water griste (corn) milles and one olde Mille House' in Broadclyst. 

By 1661 there were three mills in the area all working to help feed the villagers. 

1791

An example of 15th century title deeds © John Hammond

An indenture (deed, contract or agreement) of 1791 refers to two grist mills co-exsisting in the area. 

1806

Watermills were an important part of the local economy © Andrew Butler

The watermill and windmill were leased by Samuel Flood, a miller. 

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