History

Traditional building techniques

Cottage floor

Immerse yourself in the atmosphere of the central hall © S Parsons

March 1992: A traditional lime-ash floor was laid as part of a restoration project. This was sealed and polished with egg whites.

This floor took a year to dry, but after three months, a rush mat was laid allowing the surface to dry slowly and be walked on.

Cob summerhouse

2000: The National Trust built a cob summerhouse in the orchard to showcase traditional building techniques.

Cob is a mixture of clay, sand, straw, water, and earth, and is fireproof and flexible. The roof is thatched with wheat straw.

Through the ages

 

1790-1814

The first record of ownership comes from the Land Tax Assessments. These note that the cottage was owned from 1790-1814 by Sarah Marker.

Through the ages

Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 10th Baronet, who built cottages for his employees © Sophia Farley

1824

Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 10th Bt, held the property in 1824. It has been part of the Killerton estate ever since.

Through the ages

Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 10th Baronet, who built cottages for his employees © Sophia Farley

Mid 19th century

The cottage was divided between two families, with an additional staircase and front door built for the second family.

Be a history detective at Marker's

Detail of the painted screen

Marker's cottage dates back to the 15th century, but its secrets were only discovered when the cottage was being modernised.

Painted wooden screens were discovered behind a covering of plaster board.

Find the smoke blackened timbers

Timbers blackened by smoke from the central fire

Make sure that you find the smoke blackened timbers in the roof, dating back to the 15th century.

Imagine what life was like when it was first built and the fire was on the floor in the centre of the cottage.

Discover the small forge

Barrels for the local cider industry and iron hoops were made here

In the 19th century, the cottage was divided up and rented to three families. One of them, William Luccraft, used the outbuilding as a forge.

This was one of over 250 cottages that was let by Sir Thomas Acland.

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