Knole Park

Kent's last medieval deer park

You can enjoy a quiet moment with the fallow deer at Knole Park in Kent

You can enjoy a quiet moment with the fallow deer at Knole Park in Kent

Kent's last medieval deer park is home to a herd of about 500 deer. They're descendants of those hunted by Henry VIII and have very little fear of humans. They have plenty to eat in the park throughout the year so please don't feed them.

Join us for short guided walks at 2pm on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 13 March. Sunday walks are especially suitable for children. Check our events page for details. Dogs on leads welcome.

Accessible walk

There's lots to see on our all-ability walk © NT N. B-Peach

A flat route based on the deer park walk, suitable for pushchairs and wheelchairs.

Deer park walk

Knole Park has a thousand acres to explore year-round on foot © Jo Hatcher

Our deer park walk takes you around the open spaces in the south of the park.

Woodland walk

Knole has ancient trees and managed plantations, on an SSSI © Jonathan Sargant

This walk takes you through some of Knole's wooded areas and plantations.

Knole to Ightham walk

Signpost to One Tree Hill on the Knole to Ightham trail © Jonathan Sargant

Did you know you can visit two of England’s most important historic houses on a 4-mile, almost straight route? The Greensand Way links Knole and Ightham Mote via One Tree Hill, famous for its sweeping views over the Weald of Kent.

Join our weekly walkers

Weekly health walks take place at a number of National Trust properties © Walking for Health / Natural England

Every Thursday morning, join a group of local people on an hour's easy walk through the park.

Virtual geocaching

High tech fun for all ages © David Jones

Geocaching's a different kind of treasure hunt: If you have a handheld GPS system, why not try our new Virtual geocache trail. Instead of hidden boxes, you'll find some unusual and interesting things around the park near the house...look up the answers here.

Activities in Knole Park

Knole has been home to the same deer herd since at least the 15th century

Knole has been home to the same deer herd since at least the 15th century

Knole's a grand place for walkers of all ages and abilities. Wrap up warm and explore on your own with one of our downloadable trails on this page. When the weather's warmer, do check our events page for details of guided walks in the park.

More about the park

The deer

A buck at Knole tries to attract females by grunting © Jonathan Sargant

The herd at Knole is mostly made up of fallow and the Japanese sika deer. The fallows were introduced into Britain by the Romans, and hunted for sport. The sika deer were brought into parks during the 17th century, and to Knole in the 19th.

The park

Magnificent stags roam the medieval deer park at Knole, Kent © Emily Watts

The 15th-century deer park comprises ancient woodland, dry heathland, acid grassland and wood pasture: the result of centuries of constant park management. Many features of the original wild forest, which once stretched across southern Britain, survive here.
 

The ice house

Descendents of the medieval herd, by the ice-house in the park at Knole © Jonathan Sargant

Before refrigerators, ice houses stored ice in the summertime. The one at Knole is at least 200 years old. People found that meat and other foods could be kept fresh by being packed in ice, especially when it is protected by walls insulated by the earth.

Special Scientific Interest

Descendents of the medieval herd, by the ice-house in the park at Knole © Barbara Taylor

Natural England designates certain areas as important for wildlife. Knole Park is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), mainly for its important deadwood invertebrates such as beetles and woodlice. 

Share