History

1931 - Longshaw Estate acquired

The deeds for the Longshaw Estate being given to the National Trust © National Trust

The deeds for the Longshaw Estate being given to the National Trust

A public appeal by what is now the Sheffield branch of the CPRE raised the money to buy the lodge and the estate, consisting of 1087 acres of moor and woodland, from the Corporation, and in turn handed it over to the National Trust in 1931.

Construction of the Empire State Building was completed in New York City.

1939 - Froggatt Wood acquired

Discover the Oak-birch woodland that once covered much of the Peak District © Joe Cornish

Discover the Oak-birch woodland that once covered much of the Peak District

76 acres of broken woodland and pasture were given to the National Trust, 60 acres by the Sheffield & Peak District branch of Council for the Preservation of Rural England and 16 acres by Lady Riverdale in memory of her parents.

The Second World War began.

1973 - Haywood acquired

Explore the wonderful landscape around the Longshaw Estate © Joe Cornish

Explore the wonderful landscape around the Longshaw Estate

171 acres of pasture, moor and woodland at Nether Padley linking Longshaw to Froggatt Wood were acquired with a bequest from Mr TH Barker and a Countryside Commission grant.

Princess Anne married Captain Mark Phillips in Westminster Abbey.

1974 - White Edge Moor acquired

Come and stay in this gorgeous place © Robert Morris

Come and stay in this gorgeous place

124 acres of moorland on the eastern side of Sheffield Plantation were bought from the North Derbyshire Water Board with a bequest from Mr E Royce and a Countryside Commision grant.

The famous skeleton 'Lucy' is discovered in Ethiopia, where it lived between 3.9 and 3 million years ago.

Life at Longshaw during the First World War

Injured soldiers recuperating at Longshaw during the First World War © National Trust / Peak District

Longshaw Lodge was full of bustle and activity as it played a significant part in the First World War as an auxiliary hospital for injured soldiers. Read on for fascinating insights into wartime life at the lodge.

Did you know?

  • Circa 1400 as the population began to recover after the Black Death, there was a higher demand for growing crops. Steep hillsides were put to plough producing flights of ridges called strip lynchets, traces of which can be seen at Lawrence Field.
  • In 1466 Longshaw Millstones were first made at Yarncliffe Quarry, marking the first utilisation of the natural rock outcrops by man. The evolution of the Millstone Industry is easily traced at Longshaw.
  • The name 'Longshaw' first appears in a letter written by a Mr George Cooper in 1722.
  • In 1827 Longshaw Lodge was built as a shooting box by the then Duke of Rutland, for use when he was visiting his shooting estate.

History talks & walks

Throughout the year we run a number of events including talks with a cream tea, as well as guided walks around the estate all led by one of our most enthusiastic volunteers, Thelma.

Longshaw sheepdog trials

Bess the Border Collie watching over the Alport Valley

Bess the Border Collie watching over the Alport Valley

The first official sheepdog trials at Longshaw were held on 24 March 1898, after a competition between the Duke of Rutland's head shepherd and gamekeeper. They are the longest-running trials, stopping only for the two world wars. The trials continue to be held every year in early September.

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