Wildlife

Ring Ouzels

Ring Ouzels are nesting on Burbage © N.E.Wildlife

Ring Ouzels are nesting on Burbage

Six pairs of ring ouzels have nested successfully on Burbage this spring and are now in the process of fledging their nests. These migrant birds have been in decline because they like to nest in quiet, remote places which have become more difficult for them to find. Thanks to partnerships with Peak District National Park rangers and local climbers we hope we'll be able to ensure that these special birds will return each year.

Hairy Wood Ants (Formica lugubris)

Northern hairy wood ant © Changing Views

Northern hairy wood ant

Hairy wood ants are a northern species in the UK, but can be found as far south as mid-Wales. The hairy wood ant is named so because of its hairy ‘eyebrows’ visible through a microscope. Hairy wood ants live in mound-shaped nests made out of leaves and twigs and are designed to keep the nest warm by trapping heat.

Pied Flycatcher (Muscicapa hypoleca)

Loud rhythmic and melodious song is characteristic of oak woods in spring © northeastwildife.co.uk

Loud rhythmic and melodious song is characteristic of oak woods in spring

Padley Gorge is famous for these black and white birds and the best time to spot them is in woodlands April to September. Slightly smaller than a house sparrow, perching below the canopy before dropping down to the ground to feed on caterpillars amongst the oak foliage, its loud rhythmic and melodious song is characteristic of oak woods in spring.

Adder (Vipera berus)

See adders soaking up the warmth from the gritstone rocks on Eastern Moors © Adam Long

See adders soaking up the warmth from the gritstone rocks on Eastern Moors

Seen at Longshaw and on the Eastern Moors, adders are quite small & stocky. They hunt lizards and small mammals, as well as ground-nesting birds such as the Skylark and Meadow Pipit. Adders hibernate from October, and emerge in the first warm days of March, this is the easiest time to find them basking on a log or under a warm rock.

Redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus)

Between April and September is the time to spot this magnificent creature © northeastwildife.co.uk

Between April and September is the time to spot this magnificent creature

They have a distinctive bright orange-red tail, which is where their name derives from the Old English "stert" meaning animal tail. They breed in oak woodlands where it may compete with the Pied Flycatcher for nesting sites in tree holes. Walk through the woods between April and September to catch a glimpse of its quivering red tail.

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

Look out for the captivating red deer on Big Moor and White Edge © Eastern Moors Partnership

Look out for the captivating red deer on Big Moor and White Edge

Seen frequently on the moorland near Longshaw on the Eastern Moors they are a russet-brown colour. During the autumnal breeding season, known as the 'rut', males bellow to proclaim their territory and will fight over the females, sometimes injuring each other with their sharp antlers.

Whinchat (Saxicola rubetra)

Listen out for the soft clicking call of the Whinchat © northeastwildife.co.uk

Listen out for the soft clicking call of the Whinchat

Slightly smaller than a robin, the whinchat has quite a big head and a short tail. They are often seen sat on fence posts or small bushes, making a soft clicking call. Whinchats inhabit open meadows and wasteland, wet habitats and dry heath and can be seen on the Longshaw Estate.

Wide and varied habitats and creatures

Explore the wonderful landscape around the Longshaw Estate © Joe Cornish

Explore the wonderful landscape around the Longshaw Estate

There are many different types of intriguing and beautiful creatures that inhabit the moorlands and woodlands of the Peak District. Longshaw itself has some specialities not found in other parts of the National Park. Longshaw is home to millions of Northern Hairy Wood Ants which have international near-threatened conservation status.

Padley Gorge

This short film was shot at Padley Gorge in the Peak District during October and November 2012. It showcases some of the wildlife that can be found in the gorge from small insects to birds and mammals.

Hairy wood ants at Longshaw

Hairy wood ant behaviour is being tracked by tiny radio receivers in a pioneering scientific study at the Longshaw Estate in the Peak District in a three year research project.

Red Deer walk

The Eastern Edges on Big Moor is special for the diverse wildlife and is an important place for many people who enjoy walking. Look out for adders, red deer and millstone grit. This is a moderate 6 mile walk starting from Curbar Gap car park

50 things: Wildlife

Ponds are home to all sorts of wonderful creatures

Ponds are home to all sorts of wonderful creatures

Lots of the fun 50 things to do take you exploring the world of the wildlife kingdom. Have a look at the great activities below and go venture into the Peak District to try them out.

17. Set up a snail race
34. Track wild animals
35. Discover what's in a pond
36. Make a home for a wild animal
40. Go on a nature walk at night

Share