Our Estate

Buckstones

Marsden Moor © Joe Cornish

Marsden Moor

An ideal place to savour the dramatic landscape of Marsden Moor. It presents magnificent views across the Upper Colne Valley, to the beginnings of the River Colne and out to Pule Hill and Millstone Edges; a rock formation that spans a large distance.

OS ref: SE018137

Pule Hill

The rocky crags of Pule Hill are a popular spot for climbers © Simon Fraser

The rocky crags of Pule Hill are a popular spot for climbers

An impressive rocky outcrop offering incredible 360 degree views over much of the estate. A fantastic place to visit when the sun is beating down on it, but equally as spectacular on a day when there is snow on the ground.

OS ref: SE032103

Eastergate Bridge

Eastergate Bridge is an old packhorse bridge © National Trust

Eastergate Bridge is an old packhorse bridge

This scheduled ancient monument lies on the edge of the moorland, at the confluence of two streams. Dating back to the 17th-century, Eastergate Bridge is an old packhorse bridge once used by Galloway ponies to transport baskets of wool from Huddersfield to Rochdale.

OS ref: SE028121

Wessenden Valley

Looking up the Wessenden Valley from Binn Moor © Simon Fraser

Looking up the Wessenden Valley from Binn Moor

A wild and remote valley looking down across Blakeley and Butterley reservoirs. There are often fantastic sunsets here. It is also a great place to spot moorland birds such as golden plover, grouse, curlew and twite, which all breed here in good numbers.

OS ref:SE053090

Thieves Clough

Walkers on Thieves Clough make the most of the sunshine © National Trust

Walkers on Thieves Clough make the most of the sunshine

A road of historical importance, Thieves Clough is the route of the first and third turnpikes; toll roads built in 1759 and 1781. The old Roman road came this way and it is also the site of an old engine house. There is evidence of tunnel vents from the canal tunnel through the hillside.

OS ref: SE02110

White Moss

Volunteers help to improve vegetation on White Moss © National Trust

Volunteers help to improve vegetation on White Moss

White Moss is at the southern end of the estate. The old Pennine Way runs down White Moss to Black Moss.  Extensive footpath improvement works have taken place on White Moss over the past couple of years. 

OS ref: SE051064

Our Work

We work all year round to look after and restore this beautiful and important area, with the generous support of our volunteer team. If you see us working out out on site please stop and say hello!

Common Land

Marsden Moor is an area of unenclosed common land - this means that certain people, called 'commoners,' have the right to graze their animals on the land that we own.

Wildlife Haven

Marsden Moor is protected at a national and European level because of the important blanket bog habitat and the range of upland breeding birds this area supports.

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