The restless dead at Newark Park.

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After the dissolution of the monasteries in 1536, Sir Nicholas Poyntz acquired Kingswood Abbey, which he demolished to provide the building materials for his ’new work’, Newark. Some people believe that this early example of architectural salvage may have backfired, as along with the ready-shaped masonry came some spirits of dispossessed monks. 

Ghostly goings on

Strange sounds seem to be the speciality at Newark. Disembodied voices, echoing footsteps and the soft rustling of unseen fabrics have been reported by witnesses. One winter's evening when the custodian was alone in the house, quietly reading in his small sitting room (which is in the 16th-century part of Newark) he was suddenly aware that something or someone had walked across the floor of the room above him. He distinctly heard footsteps. As he knew no one else was in the house he went upstairs and looked in the room known as the green bedroom. Nothing was to be seen but the room had a chill about it that was not normal. This was a familiar occurrence at Newark and the green bedroom is thought to be haunted.

Animal instinct

On another occasion, the custodian came downstairs from the second floor to find his Great Dane, Boston, standing on the half landing at the top of the main staircase giving out a slow growl and intensely watching something at the foot of the stairs. 

'Boston's fur running down her spine was upright and the more her head moved following whatever it was she could see, the more intense her growl became. This lasted for all of ten minutes, I could see nothing but something was decidedly upsetting Boston!'

Evidence?

Fifteen years ago a photographer was working in the house taking photographs for a magazine article. The photoshoot went smoothly, but a few weeks later the photographer sent back one of the pictures he'd taken. There was an unexplained blemish, looking curiously like a figure walking across the room, though nobody else had been in the room when the photograph was taken. 

Strange happenings

Patches of intense cold and inexplicable lights have also been reported by visitors and locals alike. This has happened to the custodian on more than one occasion. Some people have said that they just had to get out of a room, others report seeing someone in a room when it  was empty, and many have felt a chill go down the spine when in a certain part of the house. The custodian feels that the atmosphere has lightened since the days of his predecessor, who lived in the house while it was still semi-derelict. 

'As the house has come back to life, the restless spirits that inhabit it have become less active. Whatever it is at Newark, it has always been benign, and not malevolent.’