Hall

The Stone Hall

The stone hall's walls are hung with animal trophies. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

The stone hall's walls are hung with animal trophies.

At the heart of the house the Stone Hall was a great hall in the 16th-century, a kitchen in the 17th-century and by 1921 an entrance hall in which parties were held and table tennis was played.

Walter Brierley’s restoration harked back to the rooms Tudor origins and the walls were adorned with game trophies.

The Dining Room & Lord Prestons Room

This room has been a dining room, smoking room and a bedroom. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

This room has been a dining room, smoking room and a bedroom.

In the 17th-century the dining room was Lord Preston’s bedchamber, with adjacent closet.

In imitation of the Court of Versailles he would receive visitors, take meals, and sleep. By the 20th-century the Dining Room became Colonel Fife’s smoking room and a ‘Georgian Green’ colour with mezzotints adorned the walls.

The Oak Hall

A mixture of oak and pine panelling dating from the seventeenth century. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

A mixture of oak and pine panelling dating from the seventeenth century.

During Lord Preston’s remodelling in the late 17th-century, this room became an entrance hall.

It was fitted out accordingly with impressive door-cases with open topped pediments, a screen of three arches and a stone floor laid in a sophisticated pattern of squares and hexagons.

The Drawing Room

The drawing room contains many gems from tapestries to a haxby paino. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

The drawing room contains many gems from tapestries to a haxby paino.

The Fifes’ Drawing Room was originally Lord Preston’s great chamber. This occupies the centre of the south front with French windows opening onto a sweeping view of the walled garden.

This room contains many treasures including a tea caddy, piano, tapestries, a mystery painting and a recently restored baby house.

Mrs Fifes Bedroom

The feminine room contains a visual history of the Rutson family. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

The feminine room contains a visual history of the Rutson family.

This feminine room is hung with a myriad of pictures that give a visual family history. These include a portrait of Mrs Fife as a girl and a charming charcoal of Peter Clive.

The room, with its views over the garden, contains a charming collection of items from crewelwork wall hangings to 18th-century furniture.

Colonel Fifes Bedroom

Colnel Fife's trophies adorn his bedroom commorating his sporting prowess. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

Colnel Fife's trophies adorn his bedroom commorating his sporting prowess.

Originally part of the Drawing Room this room was created in the early 19th-century when a partition wall was installed.

The decoration of Chinese style wallpaper, sporting trophies, and watercolours reflects the taste of Colonel Fife – a professional solider with a passion for country pursuits.

The Oak Bedroom

The oak bedroom has 16th century origins. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

The oak bedroom has 16th century origins.

The oak bedroom is in the oldest part of the house which has 16th-century origins and was regularly used as a guest bedroom, by the Fife’s, between the wars.

The older features of stout oak panelling and mullion windows are complemented by Lord Preston’s corner chimneypiece and Miles Birkett Foster’s watercolours.

The Panelled Bedroom

A section of a sampler by Sally Lawton in the panelled bedroom. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

A section of a sampler by Sally Lawton in the panelled bedroom.

As one of the oldest rooms at Nunnington Hall the panelled bedroom was used as a guest room during the 20th-century.

The oak panelling of regular squares dates to the 1630s and the architectural chimneypiece, similar to the example in the Drawing Room, was probably fitted in the late 17th-century.

The Carlisle Collection

The Carlisle Collection at Nunnington Hall

The Carlisle Collection at Nunnington Hall

This remarkable collection of miniature rooms was formed over a period of 40 years by Mrs F.M. Carlisle.

The collection consists of 16 individual rooms containing furniture and accessories at usually one-eighth of their natural size. Skilled craftsmen were commissioned to make musical instruments, furniture and other accessories some of which are made from ivory, glass, porcelain and silver.

The Hall in focus

  • This painting shows how Nunnington Hall would have looked. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

    A family history

    Nunnington Hall has been the home of many families and with each new resident the property evolve...

  • Uncovering what lies beneath the floors of Nunnington Hall. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

    Under the floorboards

    Our extensive archaeology project has investigated what lies beneath the floors of Nunnington Hal...

  • Rescuing the baby house from year of damage and neglect. © Nunnington Hall, National Trust

    The baby house

    This massive restoration project has rescued Nunnington Hall's baby house.

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