The bay revealed: Bigbury delight

Ringmore, South Devon

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
Discover the secrets of the South West with our series of one mile walks © David Bassett ABIPP MBE

Discover the secrets of the South West with our series of one mile walks

Due to current farming practises weasels-snout is now sadly rare © Mick Knapton

Due to current farming practises weasels-snout is now sadly rare

Burgh Island was made famous by Agatha Christie © Mick Knapton

Burgh Island was made famous by Agatha Christie

Route overview

Enjoy this gentle walk out to a stunning view point.  Looking west you'll see the amazing rock formations of Ayrmer Cove and the beautiful Ayrmer valley, whilst to the east is Bigbury and Burgh Island.

  • Grade of walk: Flip Flop (easy and lots of fun)
  • Type of walk: 'Beautiful Views'

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route map of the Bigbury Delight walk in Devon
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Ringmore National Trust car park, grid ref: SX649456

  1. From the car park take the waymarked path to Tobys Point, through the bank and follow the track out towards the coast.

    Show/HideEnterprise Neptune

    The Neptune Coastline Campaign our longest running appeal, which over the last 46 years has raised over £67 million. Donations to the campaign are used wherever there's a need around the shores of England, Wales and Northern Ireland and are used to help us obtain more land, as well as manage the existing sites more sensitively and sustainably. The campaign also helps us to promote coastal issues to supporters and the general public.

    Discover the secrets of the South West with our series of one mile walks © David Bassett ABIPP MBE
  2. Continue along the track until you arrive at a field gate. Take the path to the right. This path has been levelled with a solid base to provide an easy access route to the stunning Devon coastline.

    Show/HideWildlife

    The fields are rich in wild flowers associated with arable cultivation. These include plants with fascinating names such as weasels snout and field woundwort that have become scarce due to changing farming practices, such as the increased use of herbicides. These land use changes have also caused a dramatic decline in bird life, including the cirl bunting. This small bird, which superficially resembles the more common yellow hammer, can be found in the area. Numbers are now recovering through carefully targeted habitat improvement measures, funded through government agricultural incentive schemes.

    Due to current farming practises weasels-snout is now sadly rare © Mick Knapton
  3. Continue along this path. Stop at the resting points and enjoy the views across the valley to Bigbury and Burgh Island.

    Show/HideBurgh Island - out at sea

    Ideal for hermits, wreckers and smugglers, Burgh Island lies just 275yd (250m) off the mainland of the Devon coast. It's an easy walk at low tide, but best avoided at high tide. Early island dwellers included monks escaping from the distractions of everyday life and fishermen watching for the shoals of pilchards. Today, the island is the destination of a different kind of visitor, those heading for the art deco style hotel built in 1932 and most famous as the setting for a number of Agatha Christie novels.

    Burgh Island was made famous by Agatha Christie © Mick Knapton
  4. Towards the end of the path look at the dry stone wall on the right-hand side. There are often adders basking on top of the wall throughout the summer.

  5. Once you reach the end of this path stand and take a look at the stunning views, down into Ayrmer Cove and out over to Burgh Island. The bench is a good spot for a picnic, where you can take the time to truly enjoy the surrounding views and wildlife.

  6. Return to the car park by retracing you steps. If you'd like a longer walk, why not combine this with our Ayrmer Cove, Ringmore downloadable walk. Visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/walks for details.

  7. We hope that you really enjoyed this one-mile walk. The National Trust looks after some of the most spectacular areas of countryside for the enjoyment of all. We need your support to help us continue our work to cherish the countryside and provide access to our beautiful and refreshing landscapes. To find out more about how you too can help our work as a volunteer, member or donor please go to www.nationaltrust.org.uk

End: Ringmore National Trust car park, grid ref: SX649456

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Easy
  • Distance: 1 mile (1.6km)
  • Time: 30 minutes to 40 minutes
  • OS Map: Explorer OL20
  • Terrain:

    This walk is on level ground and makes for an easy stroll out to the view points of Ringmore. Take care when near the cliff edge. There are lots of resting points along the route and a bench located at the view point. Dogs are welcome on leads.

  • How to get here:

    By bus: 875, Plymouth to Bigbury-on-sea, via Ringmore, Fridays only

    By train: Plymouth, 15 miles (24.1km)

    By car: Leave A379 between Modbury and Kingsbridge, signposted Bigbury. Follow road round to St Ann’s Chapel and turn right opposite shop and post office. Follow this road for a mile through Ringmore village. Car park is signposted on left just past the last houses in village

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