House

Treasurer's House

 © Treasurer's House, National Trust

In the heart of ancient York, Treasurer's House embraces 2,000 years of history 

Just behind York Minster, you'll discover a house and garden full of stories. Find out about Frank Green, its last owner, and why the furniture hasn't moved since he left in 1930. Hear stories of Royal visits and Roman ghosts. Relax in the garden or enjoy lunch in the historic setting of the Below Stairs Café.

 

Collection

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Until his death in 1954, wealthy industrialist Frank Green amassed an eclectic collection of furniture, art and textiles

Frank bought and restored several historic houses to provide the perfect backdrops for his pieces, and the thirteen rooms at Treasurer's House display items from a 300-year period.

Entrance Hall

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Frank wanted to make a good impression on his visitors.

The fireplace, windows and decorative walls may look like original historical features, but many were actually introduced by the house's last owner, Frank.

Dining Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

With 16th century origins and 18th century embellishments, the Dining Room is full of textures and patterns.

From the intricate plasterwork carvings on the ceiling to the tripod table with carved dolphin-shaped feet, this room was one of Frank's showpieces.

Great Hall

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

The impressive space of the Great Hall is the largest room in the house,

Frank Green was convinced that this 'medieval' great hall had once been an original feature. He removed windows, panelling and an entire upper floor to transform it into a vast historic backdrop for some of the largest items from his collection of furniture, art and textiles.

William and Mary Staircase

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

A favourite feature of the house, this sweeping staircase makes for a grand entrance.

Unlike the rest of the house, the staircase has had few alterations since the early 18th century. The green patterned wallpaper is called 'Malmesbury' and was a favourite of Frank's.

Blue Drawing Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Once divided into two rooms, this elegant lounge was restored around 1910.

The peacock blue colour and bronze detailing was chosen by Frank, and gives the room a regal feel. The furniture was also chosen to impress, and includes an intricately patterned French 'Boulle' writing table.

Queen's Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

This room gets its name from the visit by future King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra in 1900.

Frank Green made few alterations to the early 18th-century interior apart from introducing the present fireplace from the adjacent Gray's Court.

Princess Victoria's Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

The room is named after Edward VII's (then Prince of Wales) second daughter, who stayed here with her parents in 1900. There is a coat of arms at the head of the tester bed.

The decor of this room originally mirrored the adjacent Queen's Room but the present paint scheme shows the room as it was in the 1920s.


Tapestry Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

The delicate tapestry gives this room its name, but all is not as it seems.

This room has been changed several times. Most significantly was the addition of a lift and bathroom within two cupboards in the 1920s. This was quite a departure from the room's 17th century origins!

King's Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Occupied by future King Edward VII on his visit with his family in June 1900, this room is part of the earliest, 16th century, section of the house.

When Edward Prince of Wales stayed in this room this room, it had white paintwork but - always a stickler for accuracy - Frank Green later introduced a stencilled scheme, based on the 16th century painted chamber at nearby St William's College.

Find out all about Frank Green

Frank Green had a keen eye for fashion and was always well turned out

Discover the story of Frank Green, the eccentric Wakefield businessman who created Treasurer's House and gave it to the National Trust, together with his varied collection of art and antiques. Look out for the quirky signs he put up around the house for his staff, including one insisting that workmen wear slippers at all times.

Read his story here

New display in the cellar

Harry Martindale telling his story about seeing ghosts of Roman soldiers in

March along to see our exciting new display about Roman York. Discover where the footprint of the Roman fort lies and find out about the legionaries and auxiliaries that were stationed here. Before you go down to the cellar, hear Harry Martindale describe his sighting of the ghosts of Roman soldiers and horses in the video interview.

House highlights

  • Picture and Seen exhibition Lantern Clock 

    Lantern clock

    In the Minstrels' Gallery, see the 17th century lantern clock with its 13-foot pendulum.

  • Original Delft tiles in Treasurers House shop © Treasurers House

    Delft tiles

    The historic kitchen - now the shop - has the original 19th-century Delft tiles.

  • Discover something new with a garden trail at Trelissick © NT / Lee Searle

    Find the Faces

    Look for funny, ancient and furry faces throughout the house with this children's trail.

  • The ship has three decks and is made from bone and whalebone © National Trust

    Model gunship

    This three-decked battleship was made by French prisoners at the time of the Napoleonic Wars.

The first floor flat

An ever changing space revealing the fascinating Frank Green

A suite of rooms once used as a flat now contains the Fascinating Frank  exhibition. Learn how to tie a bow tie and dress as an Edwardian lady in the dressing-up room. Don't forget to pick out a holiday read from our second-hand book store.

The Basement

Treasurers House basement room

Now the Below Stairs Café, the basement was once the servants' working quarters. Watch this space for details of our new installation which brings the servants' stories to life.

The Attic

Visitors don hard hats for an attic and roof tour

Don a hard hat for our tour of the attic and the roof outside. Hear about the visit of the Prince of Wales in 1900 and learn about the strict segregation of male and female servants.

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