House

Treasurer's House

 © Treasurer's House, National Trust

A tucked away town house with a 2,000 year history.

Nestled behind York Minster in the heart of the city, the house and garden you see today is a result of the dedication of Frank Green.

The house was never intended to be a cosy home and was used instead as a canvas for Frank's creative ambitions.

Collection

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Antique collecting was popular towards the end of the 19th century as people were nostalgic for stately living.

Rich businessmen like Frank began collecting antique furniture, art and textiles.

Frank used these to create the historic rooms of Treasurer's House so that they'd be perfect backdrops for his pieces.

Entrance Hall

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Like the Lobby, Frank wanted to make a good impression on his visitors.

The fireplace, windows and decorative walls may look like genuine historical features, but they were actually introduced by the previous owner, Frank.

Dining Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Located in the 16th century section of the house, the Dining Room is full of textures and patterns.

From the intricate carvings on the ceiling to the tripod table with carved dolphin-shaped feet, Frank ensured the room was a feast for the eyes.

Great Hall

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

The largest room of the house, the Great Hall is an impressive space.

Frank Green was convinced that this 'medieval' great hall had once been an original feature.

Frank removed windows, panelling and an entire upper floor to transform it into a historic backdrop to display his antique furniture, art and textiles.

William and Mary Staircase

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

A favourite feature of the house, this sweeping staircase makes for a grand entrance.

Unlike the rest of the house, the staircase has had few alterations since the early 18th century.

The green patterned wallpaper is called 'Malmesbury' and was a favourite of Frank's.

Blue Drawing Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Once divided into two rooms, this elegant lounge was restored in around 1910.

The peacock blue colour and bronze detailing was chosen by Frank, and gives the room a regal feel. The furniture was also chosen to impress, and includes an intricately patterned French 'Boulle' writing table.

Queen's Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

This room gets its name from the visit by Edward VII and Queen Alexandra in 1900.

Frank Green made few alterations to the early 18th-century interior apart from introducing the present fireplace from the adjacent Gray's Court.

Princess Victoria's Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

The room is named after Edward VII's second daughter, who stayed here with her parents in 1900. There is a coat of arms at the head of the tester bed.

The decor of this room originally mirrored the adjacent Queen's Room but the present paint scheme shows the room as it was in the 1920s.


Tapestry Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

The delicate tapestry gives this room its name, but all is not as it seems.

This room has been changed several times. Most significantly was the addition of a lift and bathroom into two cupboards. Altered in the 1920s, this was quite a departure from the room's 17th century origins!

King's Room

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection © Treasurer's House, National Trust

Frank Green loved to collect antique furniture for his exotic collection

Occupiede by Edward VII in June 1900 this room is part of the earliest, 16th century section of the house.

When Edward VII stayed this room was white but - alway a stickler for accuracy - Frank Green introduced a stencilled scheme based on the 16th century painted chamber at nearby St William's College.

History on site

  •  © Treasurer's House, National Trust

    Around the house

    Explore the 13 rooms to find the cauliflower tea-set and other favourites of Frank Green.

  • Meet the family

    Learn about Treasurer's House's owner, wealthy industrialist and passionate collector, Frank Gree...

  • Frank Green had a keen eye for fashion and was always well turned out © Treasurer's House, National Trust

    Down in the cellar

    Hear the infamous ghost story based in the cellar on one of our daily guided tours.

A work in progress

Until April 2011 this flat was lived in by a tenant who, sadly, passed away . We then wondered how this part of Treasurer's House should be used.  So, we asked our visitors who were invited to write their opinions and ideas on the walls! 

As a result, you can now learn more about fascinating Frank via an exhibition in the flat. You can also learn how to tie a bow tie or pick out a holiday read from our second-hand book store there. Young (and old?) will enjoy our dressing up room to emulate the dapper Frank Green.  As work progresses more rooms will be accessible, so do watch this space.

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