House

Dramatic architecture

Take in the stunning views of the House and Parterre. © Stuart Bebb

Take in the stunning views of the House and Parterre.

Built over a century ago, the house and its setting were created to delight and surprise the small circle of Baron Ferdinand's friends. Today it still delights many of the visitors with its dramatic architecture. 

Explore the House

See the Baron’s favourite room in the Manor  © ©Waddesdon Manor, The National Trust

See the Baron’s favourite room in the Manor

See the study where Baron Ferdinand relaxed with his favourite poodle Poupon. His armchair is still in its original position today. Discover the grand rooms within the house and imagine staying here as a guest.

Who lived here?

Portrait of Miss Alice, protector of Waddesdon Manor (1847-1922) © Waddesdon, The Rothschild Collection (National Trust)

Portrait of Miss Alice, protector of Waddesdon Manor (1847-1922)

Inheriting the manor upon her brother's death, Miss Alice de Rothschild became the protector of the house and is best remembered for her strict housekeeping rules that ensured the preservation of the collections.

Browse the collection

A view of the dining room from the east © Waddesdon, The Rothschild Collection (National Trust)

A view of the dining room from the east

With over 15,000 works of art, objects and well known for its 18th-century portraits by British artists Reynolds, Gainsborough and Romney, the house showcases the Rothschilds as great collectors.

Contemporary collection

Michael Craig Martin, Umberella Yellow  © Mike Fear

Michael Craig Martin, Umberella Yellow

Some contemporary pieces of the collection can be seen displayed around the Manor whilst the majority of works can be seen at Windmill Hill, the archive centre.

Raffle 2014

The beautiful Bali Starling that we breed at the Aviary

This year we hope to aid the Aviary in releasing the Bali Starling on the main land of Bali.  Trial releases have not been that successful. Support our appeal to help provide technical guidance, equipment & maintenance by joining in with the raffle.

Windmill Hill archive

Windmill Hill Archive Centre from the outside

Windmill Hill is home to the family archives and contemporary art, the striking design of the building lends itself to the landscape. During the main season from March to October you can visit on one of our open afternoons.

House handset tour

Take an audio tour of the house

During the main season from March to October enhance your visit with a handset tour. Learn about the history of the house and its collection, hear special talks given by the curators. Download it as an app or pick one up at the entrance to the house.

Highlights of the collection

Portraiture

The painting Boy building a House of Cards by Chardin at Waddesdon © Waddesdon, The Rothschild Collection (Rothschild Family Trusts). Photo: Mike Fear

Boy Building House of Cards (1735) is an intimate and monumental painting by Chardin. Children playing with cards, bubbles, spinning-tops or shuttlecocks were favourite subjects of Chardin. Today this painting can be seen at the end of the Starhemberg room.

Furniture

Beautiful intricate detailed cabinet by Charles Cressat © Waddesdon, The Rothschild Collection (Rothschild Family Trusts). Photo: Mike Fear

This chest of drawers (c. 1730) by Charles Cressent is one of the finest examples of his workmanship. The dramatically curved shape of this piece shows off the gilt-bronze mounts and geometrically veneered wood. Find this piece in the Grey Drawing Room.

Paintings

Dramatic views of Venice painted by Francesco Guardi  © Waddesdon, The Rothschild Collection (Rothschild Family Trusts). Photo: Mike Fear

The Bacino di San Marco with the Molo and the Doge's Palace, Venice by Guardi (1755-1763). This painting and its companion are the largest known works of Guardi, and are early examples of the real and idealistic views of Venice with which he made his reputation. Find these paintings in the East Gallery.

Porcelain

Vase with candelholders, Sevres manufactory (est.1756).  © Richard Valencia

This vase (Sèvres Manufactory, est.1756), with elephant heads, is one of the iconic shapes associated with Sèvres. Animals such as elephants appealed to the rococo taste of exoticism. A distinguishing feature of this vase is the combination of pink and green colours that appear only in objects made between 1759-1760. This vase can be seen in the Grey dining room.

Automata

Caffieri Clock (1748-1749) chased and gilt bronze  © Hugo Maertens

This clock (1749) combines the work of two of the most talented craftmen of 18th-century Paris. The case with its wind-blown leaf fronds, boldly punched patterns and flowing figure is the work of the bronze founders and chasers Jacques Caffieri. The movement of this clock was made by Julien Leroy, a leading horologist of the day. This clock can be found in the Grey drawing room.

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