Wildlife

A lost East Anglian landscape

  

Wicken Fen is one of the last remaining fragments of undrained fenland which once covered the vast lowlands of Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, Norfolk and Lincolnshire.

It was the first nature reserve owned by the National Trust and today is home to over 8700 recorded species. Click on the following link for details of Species Recorded at Wicken Fen

Wildlife viewing

Get close to nature

There are nine wildlife hides on Wicken Fen and the Vision lands. They allow you to spy on Wicken's amazing wildlife.

The two hides on the Boardwalk Trail and the hide on Tubney Fen are equipped for wheelchair users.

Wildlife sightings

Listen for the druming snipe in Spring

Check the sightings book in the Visitor Centre to catch up on the latest wildlife sightings reported by our visitors and rangers.

Don't forget to record your own sightings in the book.

 

Wicken Bird Ringers

The bird ringers have been ringing at Wicken for 46 years, during which time they have controlled over 100,000 birds - building up an invaluable insight into changing bird populations on the fen.

The rare fen violet re-discovered at Wicken Fen © Carol Laidlaw

The rare fen violet re-discovered at Wicken Fen

Violet returns

The rare fen violet (Viola persicifolia) has been re-discovered at Wicken over a decade since it was last seen.

The endangered plant which is on the UK Biodiversity Action Plan grows to a maximum of 30mm and has bluish white flowers and a mother-of pearl sheen.

Dragonflies

Emperor Dragon Fly

22 of the 23 species of dragonfly found in Cambridgeshire can be seen at Wicken Fen.

The Dragonfly Centre run by the British Dragonfly Society is open at weekends throughout the summer.

Butterfly Trail

A Common Blue Butterfly spreads its wings in the summer sun.

You can see up to 20 species of butterfly at Wicken Fen.

The best place to see them is on the Butterfly Trail, just a short walk from the Visitor Centre, off the main Boardwalk Trail.

Research & recording

For over 100 years some of the most eminent naturalists and scientists, including Sir Harry Godwin & Arthur Tansley, have studied the habitats and species found at Wicken Fen.

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