Huckers Bow salt marsh walk

Huckers Bow, Middle Hope, nr Worle, Weston-super-Mare, Somerset

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
This lagoon is a haven for wildlife  © National Trust

This lagoon is a haven for wildlife

Explore the South West with our collection of one mile walks © National Trust

Explore the South West with our collection of one mile walks

This area is steeped in history © National Trust

This area is steeped in history

Route overview

Take a walk out to St Thomas Head on the Severn Estuary, crossing some fine salt marsh and limestone grassland. Tranquil, gentle and with beautiful views

  • Grade of walk: Welly (puddles/rock pools/mud/stream)
  • Type of walk: 'Waterside Walks', 'Flora & Fauna'

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route map of the Middle Hope Huckers Bow salt marsh walk in Somerset
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Huckers Bow car park, grid ref: ST34664

  1. Take the steps up to the bridge over the Rhyne drainage ditch. Cross the bridge going through the gate onto the sea wall.

    Show/HideSalt marsh wildlife

    Along the river estuary look out for herons, little egrets, dunlin and green shank on the mud flats. In the distance are the Severn Estuary and Clevedon, while on the opposite bank, Wales is clearly visible on a nice day. The small lagoon is full of shoals of little fish. Look out for salt marsh plants such as sea aster, sea lavender and glasswort. The dry grassland has a good display of field scabious and knapweed with a large number of gatekeeper and meadow brown butterflies. The red and black burnet moth is common here.

    This lagoon is a haven for wildlife  © National Trust
  2. Drop down and right onto the salt marsh, and walk along, with the river estuary on your right. Look out for herons, little egrets, dunlin and green shank on the mud flats. In the distance is the Severn Estuary and Clevedon, while on the opposite bank, Wales is clearly visible on a nice day.

    Show/HideWoodspring Priory

    Woodspring Priorys former church tower is a prominent landmark. It was founded in the early 1200s as a small and isolated religious community. The church, infirmary building and barn were rebuilt in the 1400s. In 1536 the Priory, like all monasteries, was shut down by King Henry VIII. Many of the buildings were destroyed, but the churchs tower and nave were converted to a house. In 1971 the Landmark Trust acquired most of the Priory buildings and restored them. They can be rented for holidays. Parts of the buildings are open to the public.

    Explore the South West with our collection of one mile walks © National Trust
  3. Arrive at a small lagoon full of shoals of little fish. Walk around it, admiring the views and drinking in the peace and quiet. Look out for salt marsh plants such as sea aster, sea lavender and glasswort.

    Show/HideWoodspring Priory lands

    After 1536, Woodspring Priory was owned by a succession of families who farmed the land. In the late 19th century a golf course was set up, and the headland above the Priory was used as an army training ground. In 1918 the property was sold to Major Vernon Hill. His plans to turn the buildings into a hotel and build a town of bungalows came to nothing. In 1968 we purchased the coastline and some land to preserve it for everyones benefit. The barn is a National Trust property, but not currently open. Other land is still private property.

    This area is steeped in history © National Trust
  4. Head up and right, climbing over a stile and head up a gentle grassy slope.

  5. Turn left again through a kissing gate and follow the path across a meadow and through a gap in the hedge on the left. The dry grassland has a good display of field scabious and knapweed, with a large number of gatekeeper and meadow brown butterflies. The red and black burnet moth is common here.

  6. Follow the path along the hedge on the edge of a wood with some large Turkey oak trees in it.

  7. Go through a gate into the wood and follow the path up to the bridge and cross over it back to the car park.

  8. We hope that you really enjoyed this one-mile walk. The National Trust looks after some of the most spectacular areas of countryside for the enjoyment of all. We need your support to help us continue our work to cherish the countryside and provide access to our beautiful and refreshing landscapes. To find out more about how you too can help our work as a volunteer, member or donor please go to www.nationaltrust.org.uk

End: Huckers Bow car park, grid ref: ST34664

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Easy
  • Distance: 1 mile (1.6km)
  • Time: 30 minutes to 40 minutes
  • OS Map: Landranger 182
  • Terrain:

    Mainly flat with a few steps up to the bridge, and a gentle slope up from the lagoon. There's only one stile to cross. Dogs welcome under close control.

  • How to get here:

    • Not accessible via public transport
    • By car: Follow signs from Worle to Woodspring Priory. At end of road, before entering the faryard, turn right along a track running parallel with the Rhyne (drainage ditch) to Huckers Bow car park

     

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