Garden

Peach coloured rose with a corner view of the house in the background

The garden is particularly abundant in summer with roses coming into bloom, a historic collection of daylilies bursting onto the scene in shades of gold and a summer garden coming to life.

Late spring and early summer in the garden provides charming displays of wisteria on the north-east side of the house and around the Japanese pond.

Golden petals of a daylily
Golden yellow daylily close up
Golden petals of a daylily

Roses 

The beautifully proportioned house at Antony sits high above three terraces on the north west side. The planting scheme on the terraces consists of whites, purples and blues in muted tones designed to complement the silvery glow of the Pentewan stone. 

Roses on the terrace
Steps down from the terraces next to a bed of white roses
Roses on the terrace

Rugosa Rose or 'Blanc double de Coubert' takes centre stage on the middle terrace. These large plants produce lots of blooms early in the season and repeat flower later in the year. The flowers are pure white, tinged with blush in the bud and have a strong fragrance, which lingers on a warm summer afternoon. This type of rose is extremely hardy and disease resistant which makes it a reliable as well as attractive addition to the terrace planting. 

Summer borders of catmint & roses at Antony
White roses in a border or cat mint
Summer borders of catmint & roses at Antony

The top terrace is planted with the Iceberg variety of rose which grows in a rolling, tumbling fashion with a mass of flowers. The profusion of exceptionally snow white blooms planted alongside Nepeta 'Six hills giant' commonly known as catmint form a striking contrast. This rose can flower all the way through to Christmas if the conditions are right. 

In the formal summer garden the colours turn bolder and the planting includes Rhapsody in blue. This vibrant plant is famed as the closest example to a blue rose that hasn't undergone any genetic enhancements. The blooms grow in clusters with large amounts of green foliage. 

The summer garden

The planting scheme in the summer garden was chosen by Lady Mary Carew Pole and incorporates muted tones of pink, purple, white and yellow. The garden is at its finest during early summer with displays of roses, peonies, alliums, poppies and more. In autumn you will find dusky displays of rosehips.

Summer blooms amongst the borders at Antony
Summer flowers
Summer blooms amongst the borders at Antony

All year round highlights...

The landscape garden

Humphry Repton (1772-1818) was a leading landscape designer who helped define the concept of the landscape garden and is regarded as the greatest English landscapist to follow ‘Capability’ Brown. Repton was invited to Antony by Sir Reginald Pole Carew, MP for Fowey and Privy Councillor under Pitt, who recommended him.

Sweeping views at Antony designed by Humphry Repton
The black walnut tree at Antony and the sweeping Repton designed view down to the Lynher.
Sweeping views at Antony designed by Humphry Repton

Repton produced finely illustrated books featuring watercolours and aquatints on hinged flaps to show ‘before’ and ‘after’ views. These manuscript volumes, bound in red morocco became known as ‘Red Books’, and were produced to sell his landscape ideas to prospective clients. Such a book was prepared for Pole Carew in 1792.

Repton's design for the south west side of the house
View of Antony in Repton's red book
Repton's design for the south west side of the house
Repton's red book designs for Antony
A page in Humphry Repton's red book showing landscape garden plans for Antony
Repton's red book designs for Antony

Topiary

Knot garden

A knot garden is a style of formal garden laid out in a square that became popular in England during the reign of Elizabeth I. There are usually lots of intricate shapes and sometimes a combination of different smelling plants or different coloured greenery like the knot garden at Antony.

The intricate knot garden
Intricate green hedges of the knot garden at Antony taken at a striking angle.
The intricate knot garden

Yew hedge

The yew hedge at Antony is strikingly tall and outlines an impressive vista from the side of the house. The large hedges create drama and form new spaces. The long grassy area between the hedges is excellent for promenading.

Mysterious house and garden
Yew hedge and house in the mist at Antony
Mysterious house and garden

Yew cone

The story goes that a female member of the Carew Pole family wanted somewhere to sit and watch the tennis in the shade. The bench inside the cone hedge now looks out onto the croquet lawn but this used to be a tennis court. Apparently insects in the hedge made the sitting experience unpleasant & we're not sure it was much used. Today it is a fascinating addition to the garden enjoyed by families and garden enthusaists alike.

Cone hedge
The topiary cone shaped yew hedge in the garden at Antony.
Cone hedge

Sculptures

The hypercone

Hypercone by Simon Thomas (1997), stands in the Peony Garden. Its spiralling rings within rings are cast-iron waxed. This sculpture was inspired by the way water spirals down a plug hole.

The hypercone
The rust coloured hypercone outdoor sculpture in the summer garden at Antony
The hypercone

Cone fountain

Water cone by William Pye (1996), a fascinating bronze water feature standing on the west lawn. Pye had used the design before but added a water element for this piece. It was inspired by observing the way heavy rainfall runs down tarmac roads in rippling waves.

Antony
The conical fountain at Antony
Antony