The National Trust takes on the care of new land on the Norfolk Coast

the brown reeds are in the foreground against the blue sky in the back ground with blue water creeks meandering through
Published : 21 May 2018 Last update : 02 Jul 2018

The National Trust has added 30 acres of land at Salthouse into its care.

Working in partnership with the current grazier, the land acquisition has been made possible thanks to the generosity of National Trust supporters and donors to the National Trust’s Neptune Coastline Campaign. The campaign, which is a testament to the nation’s love of the coast, has for more than 50 years supported the National Trust’s work to care for Norfolk’s coastline well into the future. 

Victoria Egan, the National Trust’s Countryside Manager on the Norfolk Coast said:

“In the twenty-first century we face many new challenges along an ever changing coastline. We can only meet these challenges by working with coastal communities, partner organisations and people who care as much as we do about the coast. We will continue to work with the grazier, who will manage this land as our tenant.  

“The Norfolk Coast is home to a great diversity of wildlife, including some of the world’s most important species. This space inland will mean that wildlife can move, adjust and retreat as the coastline changes. Coastal change isn’t going away, so we need to work together to look at what is projected to happen in the long term.” 

Fresh water grazing marshes provide important feeding ground for over-wintering wildfowl such as brent geese
lots of black brent geese are grazing on green grass
Fresh water grazing marshes provide important feeding ground for over-wintering wildfowl such as brent geese

This land acquisition sits adjacent to existing land in the National Trust’s care, which is managed by the Norfolk Wildlife Trust. The area is subjected to natural processes, such as the action of waves, weather, tides and changes in sea level, and the National Trust team will be working to help wildlife adapt to a changing climate and shoreline. This new area of land will enable the National Trust to widen and join up habitats, which will ultimately make nature more resilient to our future coast.