Places to stay on the South Downs

Have you ever enjoyed a place so much that you didn’t want to go home? We’re confident that you’ll enjoy the South Downs and that you’ll want to make it your favourite countryside getaway spot.

To make it your perfect break in the South Downs, we've a range of accommodation to suit all budgets. Pick a cosy cottage - a home away from home with a difference. Or, for the more adventurous, you can camp under the stars.

Comfortable cottages

You can experience a slice of history with a touch of luxury at one of our exquisite holiday cottages.
 
If you’ve always wanted to stay in a thatched cottage, then Saxon Cottage in the heart of historic Steyning, and just 4 miles from Cissbury Ring, would be an ideal romantic getaway.

Bed & Breakfast

Run by Camilla and Roly, our tenant farmers at Saddlescombe, set in the heart of the South Downs and right on the South Downs Way, you can get a feel for a real traditional downland farm at this bed and breakfast - flint barns, a donkey wheel and sheep galore.  
 
After a hard days exploring you could pop into Brighton, just 5 miles away, and experience all this lively city has to offer.

Adventurous camping

For a more intimate outdoor experience and an escape from the hustle bustle of the city, we've two campsites with excellent facilities located just off the South Downs Way.
 
Gumber Bothy is tucked away in a Downland valley in Slindon Estate and offers a peaceful retreat in a converted flint barn. Whether you spend the night in the barn or camp out in the moonlight, you can relax in front of a crackling campfire at the end of the day.
 
Alternatively, camping at Saddlescombe Farm is a very different experience. This historical farm is situated just 5 miles from Brighton and is documented as far back as the Domesday Book.
 
Nestled deep in the downs, Saddlescombe holds a treasure trove of stories of the Knights Templar and farm life over the last 1,000 years.
 
From Saddlescombe you can easily discover the playground of Victorian Brighton at Devil’s Dyke and the ancient woodland on Newtimber Hill.