Taking care of the bear hut

The Bear's hut at Killerton, Devon

Last year saw a complete conservation of the Bear's hut. Have a look at the work that was done to keep the hut in great condition.

The bear hut in the garden at Killerton was built in 1808 by John Veitch on behalf of Sir Thomas Dyke Acland. It was originally built as a summerhouse for Lady Lydia and was later renamed the 'Bear Hut' after it housed the family pet.

This delightful structure has stood the test of time and was rethatched in early January 2019, but as the years went on it needed a little more conservation work.

The re-thatched roof of the bear hut, Killerton
The newly thatched roof of the bear hut
The re-thatched roof of the bear hut, Killerton

Spring 2021

Basket weave seat

February was a busy month conservation work on the hut. The highbacked seat inside was repaired by a specalist weaver using willow. Any parts of the weave that were damaged have now been replaced and it it's a comfy seat once again.

The basket weave seat inside the bear hut has been repaired
Basket weave seat inside the bear hut
The basket weave seat inside the bear hut has been repaired

Three pane window

The three pane, clear glass window to the left of the hut was repaired and refitted by the team at Holy Well Glass, a company based in Wells, Somerset, who specialise in the conservation and renovation of historic and stained glass.The original glass is beautiful and now refelects like a mirror. Using coloured putty has helped to blend the fitting in to the surrounding wood so it looks like it's always been there. A conservation job well done!

The refitted window in the bear hut, Killerton, after conservation work
The refitted window glass in the bear hut after conservation work
The refitted window in the bear hut, Killerton, after conservation work

 

Summer 2021

 

The stained glass window

The stained glass window had been removed early 2020 and temporarily replaced with clear glass. The window iwas worked on by Holy Well Glass and athough it had been ready for a while, Covid restrictions delayed it's return.

The glass was cleaned, repaired and now refitted. There's also environmental protective glazing in place, which means that there's a further outer glazed panel that protects the stained glass. The two pieces of glass don't touch and there's ventilation piece at the top. This will keep the stained glass cleaner and protect it from the elements.

We think it looks fabulous and we're sure Tom the bear would agree.

The stained glass window in the Bear Hut after conservation work
The refitted and repaired stained glass window in the Bear Hut
The stained glass window in the Bear Hut after conservation work