Introducing Heinrich&Palmer

Artists

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Heinrich&Palmer - Artists

Anna Heinrich & Leon Palmer are two UK artists who work in collaboration. They create multi-media installations and interventions in response to a wide range of sites working with a diverse range of materials and technologies. This sometimes involves collaborating with programmers, engineers, fabricators and architects to create the final artworks and experiences.

Artists' Anna Heinrich and Leon Palmer

Q. What was your first impression of Lacock and how did this inform your proposal?

For us, when visiting Lacock Abbey, there is a tangible feeling that we become part of the tradition of people drawn to this place of contemplation.  The nature of the pillar and arches in the Chaplains’ Room convey to us a sense of having sunk down into the layers of history and architecture. There is an atmosphere that becomes apparent when entering Lacock that time has slowed down and we were interested in making connections with the stories that flow from this feeling and legacy.

The Chaplain’s Room, Lacock Abbey
The Chaplain’s Room, Lacock Abbey
The Chaplain’s Room, Lacock Abbey

Q. Can you tell us about how your ideas have changed since your first site visit?

The idea for the work has evolved from the sense of people passing through Lacock over many centuries and observing how the fabric of the building seems to hold a residue of the life that has flowed through it.  The installation coincides with the centenary of Armistice Day and the decision to use silk picks up on diverse associations such as parachutes and the white poppy of peace. 

Q. Where did your inspiration come from for using fans in your piece?

There is an atmosphere that becomes apparent when entering Lacock that time has slowed down.  This seems to pervade elements such as the wave-like forms polished into some of the compacted earth floors - apparently a section of this floor was scraped flat only for the ripples to reform over a period of months.  The use of fans in our installation will pick up on this and create a space through which the slow and ancient erosion of the site can appear to flow like a time-lapse sequence.

The slow and ancient erosion of the cloister floor
The slow and ancient erosion of the cloister floor
The slow and ancient erosion of the cloister floor