Capability Brown places in the South East

Lancelot 'Capability' Brown learnt his trade experimenting at Stowe in Buckinghamshire, and went on to transform the English countryside and many aristocratic estates. This year would have been his 300th birthday, so to celebrate here's a round up of his landscapes here in the South East

The Temple of Concord and Victory stands tall. A huge golden Grecian style temple with large coloums, collonades and portico with craved murals and statues sit on the top.

'Capability' found at Stowe 

Rising through the ranks, Lancelot 'Capability' Brown learnt his trade experimenting at Stowe, making his mark on the landscape before moving on to transform the the English countryside and many aristocratic estates.

Sketch of Sheffield Park, East Sussex in late 1700s

Capability Brown at Sheffield Park 

This gardening great was the first major influence on the Sheffield Park landscape. Read on to discover what remains of his work.

The house and upper pond at Petworth in West Sussex

Capability Brown and the transformation of the park 

The majestic 700-acre park at Petworth is one of the finest surviving and unspoilt examples of an English landscape designed by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. Find out more about the transformation from formal garden to 'natural' parkland.

Golden Valley at Ashridge Estate Hertfordshire

Capability Brown at Ashridge

Around 1760 Capability Brown, a famous landscape architect, worked on Ashridge's parkland creating the Golden Valley. His work was continued 50 years later during another phase of redevelopment by one of his students, Humphrey Repton.

A wide open valley, with a Grecian temple with large coloums stands at the tip, surrounded by trees and under a purple atmospheric sky in autumn

Why was Lancelot 'Capability' Brown so important? 

Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown is Britain’s most famous landscape designer, who codified the English landscape style and worked at over 250 sites, for a client list that included the majority of the House of Lords. Brown learnt his trade experimenting at Stowe, making his mark on the landscape before moving on to transform the the English countryside and many aristocratic estates.