Woodland walks in the East of England

We care for a variety of woodland habitats in the East of England. Whether you’re visiting in the spring when new leaves begin to emerge, or in the autumn, when they’re bursting with colour – enjoy a walk amongst the trees.

Couple walking

Blakes Wood, Essex 

Don't miss exploring Blakes Wood, an ancient woodland on a sloping site spanning 100 acres of clear streams, valleys, mighty oaks, chestnuts and coppiced hornbeam. In spring the woodland floor is a riot of colourful wild flowers, then in the autumn the leaves create a kaleidoscope of colour.

Blickling woodland filled with autumn colour

Blickling Estate, Norfolk 

The estate walk of 4.5 miles takes in all the best bits of Blickling’s ancient woodland. The medieval Great Wood has changed little since the 18th century, with its mighty English oaks, groves of beech and ancient sweet chestnuts and veteran, small-leaved limes.

A road running through the woods at Felbrigg full of autumn colour

Felbrigg Hall, Norfolk 

Planted over many generations, today you'll see a wide variety of trees of all ages when visiting the woods at Felbrigg, including ancient beeches, oak, sweet chestnut, hawthorn, ash and sycamore. The Great Wood and its tree-lined Victory 'V', planted in 1946 in memory of the last Squire's brother, is well worth seeing.

A gate across a track in Hatfield Forest, with autumn mist

Hatfield Forest, Essex 

Hatfield Forest is the best surviving example in Britain of an almost complete Royal Hunting Forest. However, it's survival is under threat. Every step counts and there are some simple steps you can take to help us care for the forest. Please consider visiting during the months of May to September, when the ground is drier and easier to walk on.

Family walking their dog through Autumn wood

Ickworth, Suffolk 

Some of the woodland at Ickworth has the status of ancient woodland, meaning that there have been trees on this site since at least 1600; whereas, the wider parkland has been subtly landscaped by generations of the Hervey family, with classical Italy influencing its design.

The river running through woodland at Oxburgh

Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 

My Lady's Wood at Oxburgh is an ornamental area of water and woodland, which was created by the 6th Baronet for his wife. Like her, will you enjoy the tranquil semi-formal landscape, small bridges and summer-houses? It's the perfect place to pause for a while.

View of the trees at Sharpenhoe Clappers

Sharpenhoe Clappers, Bedfordshire 

Reputedly haunted, Sharpenhoe Clappers is part of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is crowned with traces of an Iron Age hill-fort and an impressive beech wood now covers the plateau that once might have been the interior of the fort.

Valley in the mist

Sheringham Park, Norfolk 

Along with the exotic and specimen trees brought back by the plant hunters; notable veteran trees, including oak, beech and sweet chestnuts with their twisted trunks all thrive at Sheringham Park. Each one a living sculpture, defying time itself.

Sheep in front of a tree full of autumn colour

Wimpole Estate, Cambridgeshire 

The woodland belts on the Wimpole Estate were designed by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown as a frame for the gardens and are home to an array of wildlife. With the colours of the trees ever-changing here, meander beneath the branches on a circular walk of the estate taking in the lakes, Chinese bridge and 18th-century folly.

Thank you

We couldn't do it without you

Thanks to you we're able to protect acres of woodland in the East of England for ever, for everyone.