Walking

Walking trail

Historical walk around Middle House and Darnbrook

Walking trail

Discover an area of ancient limestone pastures, upland hill farms and the beautiful Malham Tarn on a walk through this popular Dales beauty spot.

Native highland cattle at Malham Tarn, Yorkshire Dales

Map

Map route for hstorical walk around Middle House and Darnbrook

Start:

Malham Tarn car park, grid ref: SD882672

1

Turn right out of the car park and follow the road for 110yd (100m). Turn left through the gate onto an unmade road.

2

Turn right at the end of the track and continue, passing behind the bird hide, Tarn House and on through the woods. Pass through the gate and turn left uphill, towards Middle House, following the old Monks Road.

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3

Cross a stile and bear diagonally left over the side of the hill, to the left of Middle House Farm. At the top of the hill, pass through the gate and follow the track to the right after a short rise, continuing to Middle House.

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4

At the next waymarker, bear left to Darnbrook. Go over a wall stile and follow a well-worn track, descending steeply towards Darnbrook Farm.

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5

At the valley bottom, cross Cowside Beck, head towards the nearest field barn and proceed uphill to Darnbrook House. Darnbrook House appears in the survey of Fountains Abbey rentals from the 12th century onwards. Before 1186 William de Percy, a landowner, gave Fountains Abbey the pastures from Darnbrook to Malham Tarn and in 1206 Matilda, Countess of Warwick, granted the monks of the Abbey pasture for an area of Fountains Fell known as Gnup.

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6

At the road turn left and continue for 550yd (500m), then turn right onto a track. Passing to the left of a small wood, continue on the rising track to an old shooting lodge.

7

At the lodge turn left to follow the wall on your right. At the corner of the field, go through the gate and turn left, keeping fellside wall on your left. At the next wall cross a stile and the path eventually meets the Pennine Way, above Tennant Gill Farm.

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8

Follow the Pennine Way downhill to the road. Continue diagonally across the field, go over the stile and follow the track uphill, turning right at the top of the wall. Continue following the Pennine Way to the unmade road and retrace your steps to the car park.

End:

Malham Tarn car park, grid ref: SD882672

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Historical walk around Middle House and Darnbrook

Terrain

Fairly hilly, across fields and unmade tracks, with a short stretch of road walking. Some gates and stiles. Can be muddy after wet weather.

Dogs welcome under close control and must be kept on leads at certain times of the year due to livestock.

Historical walk around Middle House and Darnbrook

Contact us

Historical walk around Middle House and Darnbrook

How to get here

Address
Malham Tarn, North Yorkshire, BD24 9PT
By train

Settle station 7 miles (11.3km) away and Skipton station 19 miles (30.6km) away.

By road

Close to the A65 and Settle; 4 miles (6.4km) north-west of Malham. Follow signs from Malham.

By foot

6 miles (9.6km) of the Pennine Way runs through the estate.

By bus

From Skipton: 210/211 and 883/884 (passing close Skipton , w/e, to Malham village only); from Settle: 580/210 (to Malham village only). Also, National Trust shuttle bus service (890), Settle-Malham Tarn, Easter-Oct, w/e only.

By bicycle

The Yorkshire Dales Cycleway runs through Malham village and by Malham Tarn, (Regional Route 10), see Sustrans for further information.

Historical walk around Middle House and Darnbrook

Facilities and access

  • Free parking at Malham Tarn office, BD24 9PT
  • Toilet (not wheelchair accessible) at Orchid House, behind Tarn House
  • Café, pub and accommodation available in Malham village
  • Visitor centre at National Park centre in Malham village (not National Trust)
  • Accessible toilets with RADAR facilities available at Yorkshire Dales National Park car park in Malham Village
  • Dogs welcome under close control and must be kept on leads at certain times of the year due to livestock