Dragonflies in the woodland

Dragonflies are a popular sight

Summer is officially here and so too are an abundance of dragonflies. If you are wondering how to tell a dragonfly from a damselfly then make sure to look at the wings when the species are resting, as damselflies will tend to sit with their wings folded together and dragonflies will sit with their wings open. Dragonflies are also larger and more robust in their appearance.

Emperor Dragonfly in Nymans woodland
Emperor Dragonfly
Emperor Dragonfly in Nymans woodland

The Emporer Dragonfly

Some dragonflies can be found zooming along woodland rides while hunting, such as the impressively marked Black and Green Southern Hawker. Others busy themselves along the edge of ponds and lakes including species such as broad-bodied chasers; a species easily identifiable due to the wide, squat and wonderfully coloured bodies. The males are light blue with the females a light brown with yellow edges on the abdomen. Keep your eyes peeled also for the largest dragonfly in Sussex, the Emperor Dragonfly, which has a vivid green thorax with a blue and black abdomen. This is a highly territorial species that can be found in places where still waters occur, namely around ponds and lakes.  

Broad Bodied Chaser male dragonfly
Broad Bodied Chaser male dragonfly
Broad Bodied Chaser male dragonfly

Dragonfly Bioblitz

Nymans will be joining many other places in the London and South East region on July 6th in a dragonfly specific bioblitz. A bioblitz is a technique in which you survey and record as many different species as you can in a given time frame. Working with the help of our volunteers, we will make note of and photograph each of the species that we encounter. As the various places spot the dragonflies they will be passing the data to a team of experts who will verify all of the sightings live. The day will go a long way in providing valuable data for dragonfly species in the region and will help inform the management strategies for their habitats.