Octavia Hill centenary trail west

Toys Hill car park, Chart Lane, Brasted, Nr Westerham, Kent TN16 1QG

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
Well, well, well © Paul Naden

Well, well, well

Marble sarcophagus commemorating Octavia Hill © Steve Ayers

Marble sarcophagus commemorating Octavia Hill

Memorial seat dedicated to Caroline Hill, mother of Octavia Hill  © Paul Naden

Memorial seat dedicated to Caroline Hill, mother of Octavia Hill

Commemorative obelisk at Mariners Hill, Kent © Steve Ayers

Commemorative obelisk at Mariners Hill, Kent

Chartwell, family home of Sir Winston Churchill © Flo Smith

Chartwell, family home of Sir Winston Churchill

Stop and take in the views © Paul Naden

Stop and take in the views

Route overview

Founder of the National Trust in 1895, Octavia Hill (1838–1912) was a social reformer, philanthropist, artist and writer. A remarkable woman, her vision has led to her being a major influence on our lives today.

Celebrate her life on a walk to Crockham Hill village and the church where she was buried, up to Mariners Hill and on past Chartwell, former home of Winston Churchill.

You can also download the Octavia Hill centenary trail east, a 4-mile (6.4km) walk that you can do separately or together with this one to make up a figure-of-eight walk.

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

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  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Toys Hill car park on Chart Lane, grid ref: TQ470517

  1. Park at Toys Hill National Trust car park on Chart Lane, leading from the centre of Brasted to Four Elms. In the top left-hand corner of the car park, by the information panel, go up the steps in the direction of the arrow on the Octavia Hill Centenary Trail waymarker disc. At a crossing track and waymark post turn left, go downhill through a wooden barrier and fork left to drop down to Puddledock Lane and a grass triangle with a seat. Turn right through the hamlet and soon reach a low stone wall on the left, with steps leading down to a covered well and a viewpoint with extensive views over the Weald of Kent.

    Show/HideToys Hill

    This well was originally sunk in 1898 by Octavia Hill for the local villagers. It was restored in 1999 by the National Trust.

    Well, well, well © Paul Naden
  2. Continue on the road past the well and downhill for some distance. Where the road levels out by several isolated cottages, turn right over a stile just after the last cottage. Octavia Hill lived nearby at Crockham Hill and in 1898 she gave us one of our first properties. All that remains of this house in Toys Hill is the terrace with a sunken well. Since then, through the generosity of many different people, our ownership of Toys Hill has expanded to create an outstanding area of woodland for public access.

  3. Continue on the road past the well and downhill for some distance. Where the road levels out by several isolated cottages, turn right over a stile just after the last cottage.

  4. With fields on either side continue through two gates until reaching some impressive oast house buildings. Maintain this direction on the drive until eventually reaching a road. Turn left and very shortly you'll come to a cottage and old postbox on the right.

  5. Go through the swing gate to the left of the entrance by a stone footpath marker. You're now on the private drive of Mariners, so please keep to the footpath. Continue on through a gate into the hamlet of Froghole. Take the first turning on the left at a footpath sign.

  6. Ignore a right turn but keep straight ahead on a small footpath and down some steps. Emerging at a cottage and junction of paths, turn right onto a small lane leading to the village of Crockham Hill with its village garden, pub and church. Turn right on the main road, noting the plaque to Octavia Hill on the village sign. Very soon turn right again to Holy Trinity church.

    Show/HideCrockham church

    Octavia Hill lived at Crockham Hill and due to her efforts much of the land around here was acquired for us. She chose to be buried in Holy Trinity church in preference to Westminster Abbey and her grave can be seen under the yew tree near the porch. Inside, the church is a stone memorial to her life as well as the Octavia Hill memorial window illustrating the worst of urban life in contrast to country life, the benefits of which Octavia wanted for everyone.

    Marble sarcophagus commemorating Octavia Hill © Steve Ayers
  7. Leaving the church just as the lane bears right to pass the school, turn sharp left to a kissing gate leading to a picnic area. Go through a metal gate on the other side and maintain this direction across a field heading towards the hamlet of Froghole in the distance.

  8. In the far corner of the field go through a kissing gate and cross a stream. Continue up the next field to a stile. Beyond an enclosed path take the steps leading up to Froghole. Turn left onto the lane and on reaching gates at the end just before a main road, turn right up the steps.

  9. At the top of the steps turn right to follow the contour of Mariners Hill to a memorial seat with a spectacular view.

    Show/HideMariners Hill

    The seat on this hill commemorates land given to us in remembrance of Octavia Hill's mother, Caroline Southwood Hill (1809-1902). A writer and educationist, she was involved in social reform activities and was an inspiration to Octavia.

    Memorial seat dedicated to Caroline Hill, mother of Octavia Hill  © Paul Naden
  10. Continue on the path across two stiles and past a commemorative obelisk for land given to us. A little further on is another seat, dedicated to one of Octavia's five sisters, Harriot York. Maintain this direction at a crossing track and follow the path around Mariners Hill, with magnificent views across the Weald of Kent.

    Show/HideMariners Hill Obelisk

    Obelisk commemorating the land given to the National Trust.

    Commemorative obelisk at Mariners Hill, Kent © Steve Ayers
  11. Enter woodland and almost immediately turn right. Continue downhill to a wooden post on the left and turn left onto a clear footpath. Following the contour of the hill for some distance the path finally bears right downhill to Chartwell (National Trust). Refreshments and toilets are available here.

    Show/HideChartwell

    Chartwell, the home of Winston Churchill from 1924 until the end of his life, remains much as it was in his lifetime, reflecting his career and interests. The hillside gardens have magnificent views over the Weald.

    Chartwell, family home of Sir Winston Churchill © Flo Smith
  12. Cross the road to a small enclosed footpath to the left of Chartwell entrance gate. At the top of the hill cross a lane to a wide footpath opposite. Maintain this direction for some distance, ignoring any turnings to the left, until coming out to French Street hamlet.

  13. Turn right onto the lane and shortly take the left fork to Highview. Continue on this lane past French street Farm and between hedging to another fork. Bear left to Highview Cottage and enter the woodland of Toys Hill.

  14. Stay on this wide track, ignoring any side turnings, until reaching the site of Weardale Manor. Continue straight ahead and soon bear left. At a waymark post fork right to return to the car park. If you wish to continue walking there is another walk - Octavia Hill trail east - that is 4 miles and takes you to Ide Hill village and Octavia's commemorative seat, passing Emmetts Garden on the way back.

    Show/HideWeardale Manor

    Originally built for Lord and Lady Stanhope as a summer home, Weardale Manor was an 145-roomed Tudor-style mansion. The house only stood for 33 years before it was demolished in 1939. The original lodge house for the mansion can still be seen opposite the Fox and Hounds pub in Toys Hill.

    Stop and take in the views © Paul Naden

End: Toys Hill car park on Chart Lane, grid ref: TQ470517

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Moderate
  • Distance: 6 miles (9.6km)
  • Time: 3 hours 30 minutes
  • OS Map: Explorer 147; Landranger 188
  • Terrain:

    The terrain varies throughout the route; some areas are quite rough and have steep slopes and some steps, including rough paths through woodland. Some sections are on the road so be aware of traffic. Dogs are welcome on the trail but not in the house at Chartwell and must be kept on a short lead whilst in the garden there.

  • How to get here:

    By bus: service 404, Sevenoaks to Ide Hill (very limited service)

    By train: Sevenoaks station then 404 bus to Ide Hill

    By bike & by car: From A25 in Brasted village take Chart Lane leading to Toys Hill car park (National Trust)

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