Botallack mining walk

Botallack, St Just, Cornwall TR19 7QQ

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
The Count House at Botallack © Sue Brackenbury

The Count House at Botallack

A good head for heights? © Paul Baker

A good head for heights?

Look out for the rare Cornish chough © Richard Allen

Look out for the rare Cornish chough

Route overview

This walk goes through outstanding historical and industrial sites set in coastal heathland, with rare wild flowers. Here, passing choughs with their 'cheoow' can be heard. The whole walk lies in the Cornish Mining World Heritage Site.

  • Grade of walk: Trainer (all rounder)
  • Type of walk: 'Beautiful Views', 'Historical Footsteps', 'Flora and Fauna'

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route map for NT One walk 84 Botallack Mining walk
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Count House, Botallack, St Just, grid ref: SW365332

  1. Turn left onto the track heading back to Botallack village.

    Show/HideThe Count House

    Built around 1861 as the residence and offices for the Captain and staff of the Botallack Mine, it was also the centre for accounts for the mine, and where mine workers would come on a monthly basis to be paid. At the height of Cornish mining, count houses were also the scene of lavish dinners when shareholders gathered to examine the mine accounts. Visit the Geevor Mine Museum in Pendeen to see the tin dinner service used here. The Count House is now a centre for interpretation and education and used for a range of community events.

    The Count House at Botallack © Sue Brackenbury
  2. At the ruined shed, turn right down the track to the coast.

    Show/HideThe Cornish mines

    In 2006 Botallack was given World Heritage Site status by UNESCO, joining 900 places around the world with this designation. This testifies to the importance of the mining landscape, its historic features and the technological developments and scientific research which took place here. The Cornish had a huge influence on the development of mining throughout the world. Between 1815 and 1915 over 250,000 people left to work in other mining areas, and its estimated that there are 6 million people of Cornish descent globally.

    A good head for heights? © Paul Baker
  3. At the engine house, take the right hand junction east along the coast path. Continue along the footpath and head through the remains of the old tin mining works. More information on the mining works can be found at the Botallack Count House.

    Show/HideThe Cornish chough

    The choughs you may see flying overhead are easily distinguished from other members of the crow family by their red bills and legs and their distinctive 'cheeow' call. Formerly widespread around the UK coast, chough became extinct in England when the last bird died in the 1970s. Reintroduction of grazing to coastal grasslands and heaths has improved the availability of the short, open vegetation that they rely on for feeding. This is enabling a slow recovery of the Cornwall population with the return of a breeding pair to Lizard Point in 2002.

    Look out for the rare Cornish chough © Richard Allen
  4. Turn right onto the track and head back to the car park.

  5. We hope that you really enjoyed this one-mile walk. The National Trust looks after some of the most spectacular areas of countryside for the enjoyment of all. We need your support to help us continue our work to cherish the countryside and provide access to our beautiful and refreshing landscapes. To find out more about how you too can help our work as a volunteer, member or donor please go to www.nationaltrust.org.uk

End: Count House, Botallack, St Just, grid ref: SW365332

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Easy
  • Distance: 1 mile (1.6km)
  • Time: 30 minutes to 40 minutes
  • OS Map: Explorer 102
  • Terrain:

    This walk has some uneven surfaces, and the path is close to cliff edges in some places. Dogs are allowed but keep a close eye on them.

  • How to get here:

    By bus: All year round the St Just to Penzance number 10a. In the summer the Penzance to Land's End number 300.  Alight in Botallack village by the Queens Arms and from the bus stop head north through the village to the road junction, then follow the track past Botallack Manor to the Count House

    By train: Penzance station, 7 miles (11km)

    By car: Take the B3306 from St Ives or St Just to Botallack, take either turn into the village and where the two roads meet, take the track out to the coast. Parking available in the area just beyond the ruins near the Count House. There is a bike stand outside the Count House


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