Saddlescombe Farm and Newtimber walk

Saddlescombe Farm, Saddlescombe Road, Brighton BN45 7DE

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
A rarely seen view of Devil's Dyke valley from Saddlescombe chalk pit © Graham Wellfare

A rarely seen view of Devil's Dyke valley from Saddlescombe chalk pit

There's a spiritual atmosphere as the sun sets over this ancient barrow © Graham Wellfare

There's a spiritual atmosphere as the sun sets over this ancient barrow

Dewponds offer a watery sanctuary in an otherwise dry landscape © Dave Fawcett / National Trust

Dewponds offer a watery sanctuary in an otherwise dry landscape

A purple haze transforms Newtimber hill in September © Dave Fawcett / National Trust

A purple haze transforms Newtimber hill in September

The Saddlescombe donkey wheel originally drew water from a nearby well © National Trust

The Saddlescombe donkey wheel originally drew water from a nearby well

Route overview

Fresh air, spectacular views and an ancient landscape will accompany you along this scenic downland walk, near Devil's Dyke, West Sussex. Get back to nature, and be greeted by hilly banks carpeted with flowers and teeming with insects. Discover our watery dewpond, a perfect haven for wildlife. Catch a glimpse into the past when you visit the old donkey wheel, traditionally used to draw water for the farm. Finally, why not finish off your walk with a lovely cup of tea and a tasty slice of cake from the Hiker's Rest Cafe?

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Route of the Saddlescombe Farm and Newtimber walk in Sussex
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: National Trust 'Newtimber Hill' sign, grid ref: TQ272115

  1. From the car park, cross the road and follow the track into Saddlescombe Farm. On your left you'll see the National Trust 'Newtimber Hill' sign. Enter the gate, turn left immediately, and follow the path uphill. Go over the stile alongside the metal gate, and bear right.

  2. On your left is the the remains of the disused chalk quarry. Continue uphill to the top-most edge of the quarry, and take in the views of the Devils Dyke valley. To the right of the valley lies Fulking Escarpment (with its pylons perched on the top). Further to the right, you'll see Chanctonbury Ring; a hill in the distance topped with a circle of trees.

    Show/HideSaddlescombe chalk pit

    It's believed Saddlescombe chalk pit was last used in the 1870s. For centuries, chalk was mined here and burnt in the lime kiln at the bottom of the pit. The lime produced was then used both to supplement the heavy clay soils of the Weald and for making mortar.

    A rarely seen view of Devil's Dyke valley from Saddlescombe chalk pit © Graham Wellfare
  3. Turn around so that the quarry is behind you. Walk straight up the hill towards the clump of trees. Keep the trees to your right, continue for 270yds (250m), heading towards a mound in the distance.

  4. Upon reaching the mound (often referred to as a barrow) you'll notice its concave top. Walk around the left side of the mound until you reach the opposite side. You'll see three large trees in the distance with a wide grass path running through the centre.

    Show/HideNewtimber North Hill barrows

    The South Downs are littered with mysterious lumps and bumps and Newtimber is home to a fine selection. Some believe this mound to be a bowl barrow (burial mound) dating back thousands of years. This commanding point would have been selected due to its chalky banks being visible for miles around. The depression in the top of the mound could indicate Victorian archaeologists plundering the grave for treasures. However, some say the mound may be a gun emplacement from the Second World War, or it could be a combination of the two; a burial mound converted into a gun emplacement.

    There's a spiritual atmosphere as the sun sets over this ancient barrow © Graham Wellfare
  5. Just after the trees, you'll reach the first fork in the path. Take the left-hand grassy track and continue until you reach a second fork, take the right-hand grassy track. Walk on until you find a large dried-up dew pond to your right. Go around the dew pond towards the fence on the opposite side where you'll find a water-filled dew pond.

    Show/HideDew ponds

    Dew ponds are an historic feature on the Downs, possibly dating back thousands of years, and would have served as drinking sites for sheep. Given the porous nature of chalk, the ponds had to be clay-lined to hold water. Newtimber is home to three dew ponds, which provide a wonderful wildlife haven for newts, dragonflies and beetles. The wooden fence keeps the cattle and their dung at bay.

    Dewponds offer a watery sanctuary in an otherwise dry landscape © Dave Fawcett / National Trust
  6. Rejoin the grassy track and walk for roughly five minutes, passing a cluster of trees to your left.

  7. Twenty metres before you come to a wooden gate, turn right and you'll see Saddlescombe Farm in the distance, with a shallow ditch and bank in the foreground. This ditch is a cross ridge dyke. Follow the ditch down the slope towards the farm. You'll come to a short concrete post in front of you. Bear left at the post and head towards the fence line and gate in the bottom corner of the field.

    Show/HideCross ridge dyke

    This man-made cross ridge dyke runs north-south, and is thought to date from the late Bronze Age period. It would most likely have served to enclose cattle within different territories.

  8. Go through the gate, and follow the flat grassy track (keep the fence on your right) towards Saddlescombe Farm for ten minutes. The slope to your left is a spectacular spot for wild flowers.

    Show/HideWild flowers

    If you're walking here in June, the bank above you should be a wonderful carpet of common spotted and fragrant orchids and downland flowers, all alive with a variety of insects. In September, you'll be greeted by a purple haze of Devil's bit scabious the downland equivalent of bluebells in a wood.

    A purple haze transforms Newtimber hill in September © Dave Fawcett / National Trust
  9. Keep to the flat track, passing a water trough on your right. Continue until you reach the bottom corner of the field and go through the wooden bridle gate on your right (marked South Downs Way with a blue access arrow).

  10. Walk straight ahead for 22yds (20m), until you come to a stile on your left with a sign for Saddlescombe Donkey Wheel. Cross the stile, and follow the grass path as it bears to the left. Cross a second stile to find the donkey wheel straight ahead of you.

    Show/HideDonkey wheel

    This large wheel was turned by a donkey or pony for hundreds of years. The well, some 164ft (50m) below, provided fresh drinking water for the whole farm. Mr Stan Hollingdale, who still lives at the farm, remembers it last being used back in the 1930s. The connection of Saddlescombe to mains water left the wheel and its donkey redundant.

    The Saddlescombe donkey wheel originally drew water from a nearby well © National Trust
  11. Retrace your steps back to the donkey wheel sign. Go over the stile, and turn left. Continue along the hard track, keeping the farm on your left.

  12. When the track forks, bear left down to the Hikers Rest cafe and enjoy a well-deserved rest and a cup of tea. To return to the car park, turn right out of the cafe and follow the track.

End: Hiker's Rest tea-rooms, grid ref: TQ273115

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Moderate
  • Distance: 1.5 miles (2.4km)
  • Time: 1 hour to 1 hour 30 minutes
  • OS Map: Explorer 17; Landranger 198
  • Terrain:

    Short, steep ascent to begin but then gently undulating, grassy terrain. Most of the walk is on open grassland. Start and end of walk can be muddy in winter. Dogs are welcome but must be kept on leads, as livestock in surrounding fields. No dog bins so please take dog litter home.

  • How to get here:

    By foot: Footpaths from Brighton (5 mile/8km), Fulking and Poynings (both 1 mile/1.6km) or use the South Downs Way. Option to link into The Telegraph Devil's Dyke walk

    By bike: Cycle path from Hove off National Cycle Network Route 20 (see Sustrans website), plus others including the South Downs Way

    By bus: Service 77 from Brighton (http://www.buses.co.uk/), daily in high summer, weekends and bank holidays for the rest of the year. Alight Devil's Dyke and walk down to Saddlescombe Farm

    By train: Brighton station is 7 miles (11km) from Devil's Dyke, then take the 77 bus (see By bus above)

    By car: Signposted 2 miles (3km) north of A27 Brighton ring road and 1 mile (1.6km) south of A281. Nearest postcode BN45 7DE. Parking layby located opposite Saddlescombe Farm

     

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