History

The decoratative south entrance to the house © Geoff Smith 2011

The decoratative south entrance to the house

A Tudor palace turned family home

The house was built as a huge palace in the 16th century for Lord Sandys, Henry VIII's Lord Chamberlain. It then went through a series of changes in the 18th and 19th centuries, leaving the house as an archive of changing tastes in interior design.

Ebony casket

The Vyne © John Hammond

The Vyne

On your visit to the china room you'll find this Italian ebony casket, c.1720, with panels of pietra dura mounted in ormolu and encrusted with semi-precious stones. The giltwood rococo stand on which it rests is English, 18th century.

Cricket scene

Sketch depicting cricket scene at The Vyne © Karen Laverick 2007

Sketch depicting cricket scene at The Vyne

In the west corridor leading to the stone gallery hangs this picture of a cricket scene, c.1865, attended by members of the Chute family.

Carved stone head

Carved stone head representing God the Father © Geoff Smith

Carved stone head representing God the Father

This carved stone head representing God the Father is to be found in the ante chapel. The stone head is from a Holy Trinity c.1520-30.

Tudor brickwork

Example of Tudor brickwork at The Vyne © Geoff Smith

Example of Tudor brickwork at The Vyne

Look for this wonderful example of Tudor brickwork on the south front of the house. The 'diaper work' is of blackened bricks in a lozenge or diamond pattern.

Hunting scene

Painting by RB Davis, hunting scene © ©NTPL/John Hammond

Painting by RB Davis, hunting scene

The Hunting Scene by R B Davis is a fine example of an 18th-century oil painting that you'll see in the upper west corridor of the house. It was photographed after conservation.

Carved pomegranate

Carved Oak pomegranate in Oak gallery at The Vyne © James Mortimer

Carved Oak pomegranate in Oak gallery at The Vyne

This detailed close up of a carved pomegranate representing Aragon is part of the wall decor that can be found in the oak gallery.

Roman emperor

Terracoota bust of Emperor Probus, The Vyne © Geoff Smith

Terracoota bust of Emperor Probus, The Vyne

This impressive medallion terracotta bust of the Roman Emperor Probus (c. AD 282) resides in the stone gallery. It still exhibits very fine detail, despite its age.

Gold ring

Discover our treasures, including what may have been Tolkien's inspiration © David Levenson

Discover our treasures, including what may have been Tolkien's inspiration

A close view of a gold ring that's on display in the library. It was originally found at Silchester in 1786. It has an inscription on the band and the head of a lion marked on it detailing a curse. It has recently been suggested that this ring was the inspiration for The Lord of the Rings.

Stained glass window

Wonderfull stained glass window in the Tomb Chamber at The Vyne © ©NTPL/Nadia Mackenzie

Wonderfull stained glass window in the Tomb Chamber at The Vyne

This picture shows detail of The Adoration of the Shepherds by John Rowell (1689 - 1756) after Sir Anthony van Dyck, which you can see in the tomb chamber. Stained and painted glass, early 18th century.

Rameses

Rameses IV figurine at The Vyne © Geoff Smith

Rameses IV figurine at The Vyne

This green schist (a type of rock) figure of Rameses IV sits on the north staircase landing. This is a cast of the original figure that was sold to the British Museum in 1956.

A quick history

  • 1268 - The first recorded reference to the Vyne
  • 1488 - The Vyne passes down through three men all named William Sandys
  • 1510, 1531 - Henry VIII visits. He brings Anne Boleyn in 1535
  • 1653 - Colonel Sandys's son sells the Vyne to raise money
  • 1770 - John Chute adds staircase hall and other fashionable pieces
  • 1842 - Wiggett Chute renovates the Vyne, adds heating in stone gallery
  • 1956 - Sir Charles Chute dies and leaves the estate to us
  • 2000 - Work under tomb chamber reveals empty vaulted chamber

Hundred Guinea Oak

At the time of Trafalgar, William John Chute was offered 100 pounds for this tree's timber. He refused and later was offered 100 guineas. Thankfully, he refused again and we can enjoy its majesty today.

The summer house

The summer house was probably built in the mid 17th century. Used as a place to take tea and later as a dovecote, the domed roof is one of the earliest examples known.

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