Nature & wildlife

As the UK's biggest land owner, we look after a lot of nature and wildlife. We strive to maintain our land as an environment that supports a rich diversity of life.

Manchester Snowdrop City

Snowdrop City installation at Manchester Art Gallery © National Trust

Snowdrop City installation at Manchester Art Gallery

To mark the centenary of the First World War in 2014, volunteers and community groups planted 100,000 snowdrop bulbs - a symbol of hope and peace - across a number of sites in Manchester.

New plant named after Attenborough

Attenborough’s hawkweed growing on the rocky ledges of Cribyn © Tim Rich

Attenborough’s hawkweed growing on the rocky ledges of Cribyn

A new species of wild flower has been named after the world-famous naturalist and broadcaster, Sir David Attenborough. The yellow flower named Attenborough's hawkweed (Hieracium attenboroughianum) was found by naturalists on a mountain we look after in the Brecon Beacons in South Wales.

Help ensure marine wildlife has a home

The Farne Islands © Joe Cornish

The Farne Islands

As the Government announces a second public consultation on Marine Conservation Zones, we need your help to ensure important marine landscapes and wildlife in English waters are given the protection they need.

Better landscapes partnership

Heather and gorse lining the coast path on the Hangman Hills, Devon © NTPL/National Trust Images/David Noton

Heather and gorse lining the coast path on the Hangman Hills, Devon

We've joined forces with charities across the UK to call for the protection of treasured landscapes. The Landscapes for Everyone vision calls for better landscapes for people, including improving and maintaining public green spaces.

Blakeney is top breeding spot for seals

Grey seal pup and mother at Blakeney Point, Norfolk © NTPL/Ian Ward

Grey seal pup and mother at Blakeney Point, Norfolk

Blakeney Point in Norfolk has become the largest breeding site for grey seals in England, our seal count reveals. It now has a booming seal population, as a result of safe breeding conditions.

Rollercoaster year for wildlife

Little tern’s nest on the beach at Blakeney © NTPL/Ian Ward

Little tern’s nest on the beach at Blakeney

2014 was an unpredictable year for UK wildlife. Our State of Nature report looks back on the winter storms, a blistering summer and explores which species were the winners and losers over the last 12 months.

Seasonal reflections

Wild places

  • Fingle Woods

    These natural woodlands have been around for well over 400 years.

  • Wild Ennerdale

    With 400 year-old forests, this valley in the Lake District feels like another country.

  • Wicken Fen

    We've looked after the wetland nature reserve of Wicken Fen for over 100 years.

  • High Peak Moors

    The term iconic is often overused, but the High Peak Moors truly merits that description.

Farne Island seals

The Farne Islands are home to England's largest breeding population of Atlantic grey seals. Every autumn the Island's rangers begin their annual seal count, and this year's first arrival was captured on camera.

Success stories

We look after lots of nature and wildlife and strive to maintain our land as an environment that supports a rich diversity of life. Here's a selection of our success stories.

Knowledge bank

Want to know what our conservation policy is?  How we look after bats at our properties or what our conservation principles are?  You can find all the details here.