Cott Brake walk

Arlington Court, Arlington, Near Barnstaple, Devon EX31 4LP

Route details and mapDownload as a print friendly PDF
Willow reflected in the partially frozen pond © Alison Lee

Willow reflected in the partially frozen pond

A miniature life form; lichen on a tree branch © Sharon Ford

A miniature life form; lichen on a tree branch

Red deer gaze on back lawn at Arlington Court © Dave Gibbons

Red deer gaze on back lawn at Arlington Court

Explore the 19th-century main house and servants' quarters © Dave Gibbons

Explore the 19th-century main house and servants' quarters

Route overview

This walk takes you through ancient woodland and parts of the area designated a wildlife reserve by Miss Rosalie Chichester, the Court's former owner. It partly follows the route taken by the Court Canter, the annual 10km run organised by the North Devon Road Runners.

Route details

See this step-by-step route marked on a map

Arlington Court, Cott Brake, walk, map, Devon
  • Directions
  • Route
  • Bus stop
  • Parking
  • Toilet
  • Viewpoint

Start: Old Kitchen tea-room, grid ref: SS611405

  1. From the tea-room, follow signs to the Carriage Museum. Before you reach the church, the path goes right and past the Wilderness Pond. From here, head down into the Wilderness. Follow the track down the hill for about 400m and take the left hand fork down a steep slope to a gate.

    Show/HideThe Wilderness Pond

    This ornamental, yet natural looking pond, was created in the early 1800s as part of Sir John Chichester's (1st Baronet of Arlington Court) extensive remodelling of the gardens. Further into the Wilderness, otters are occasionally spotted in the pools and stream.

    Willow reflected in the partially frozen pond © Alison Lee
  2. Through the gate follow the track to Smallacombe Bridge, cross the bridge and turn left, following signs for Tucker's Bridge.

  3. At Tucker's Bridge do not cross the bridge, but take the right hand fork, signed Shirwell, and follow the track alongside the river. Go through a gate into a wooded meadow.

    Show/HideTucker's Bridge

    This is one of the most important wildlife areas on the estate. It is a mixture of wet woodland and boggy grassland; a habitat for lichens, bats and butterflies. The origin of the name is not known; Tucker is a local name, but may relate to the wool trade.

    A miniature life form; lichen on a tree branch © Sharon Ford
  4. Follow track for 200m, go through two gates. After the second gate, immediately turn left and walk up a steep hill with woodland on your left. At top of hill go over the stile on your left. You are now on Cott Brake; look out for the red deer and views back to the Court and the village of Loxhore.

    Show/HideRed Deer

    This is the best walk on which to see deer, as you pass over Cott Brake, an area of steep grassland.

    Red deer gaze on back lawn at Arlington Court © Dave Gibbons
  5. Turn right and follow the fence (collapsed hedgebank) on your right, keeping to the brow of the hill, for about 300m. Climb over the stile at the end of the field into Cott Wood, where you can follow the small woodland track through the wood for about 400m.

  6. Go over the stile at the end and turn left. After 10m turn left down main track; this is steep and rocky in places. At the bottom you join a tarmac road, cross Cott Bridge and then follow the road uphill, bearing left. At the top of the hill you will see Loxhore Lodge, accessed through large gates marked by herons.

    Show/HideLoxhore Lodge

    The Lodge house dates from 1870. It marks an entrance to the estate created to enable easy access to the train station that once existed at the village of Snapper.

  7. Go through the gate and onto the wide track. Follow this track for about 3/4 mile (1 km), ignore forks, until you reach Tucker's Bridge (signed). At Tucker's Bridge do not cross, but follow the track uphill.

  8. Stay on this track, following signs for Arlington Court. You will reach a fork; stay left. You then end up at a gate, go through and stay on the grassy track following uphill. The track goes through a few more gates - please stay on this track.

  9. You will see the Obelisk viewpoint on your left, although you are not in the field with the structure itself.

    Show/HideObelisk

    Marking the site of a bonfire held to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee, this is also a wonderful place from which to view the house and garden.

    Explore the 19th-century main house and servants' quarters © Dave Gibbons
  10. After this, follow the track to another gate, go through and immediately turn right. Follow a hedgebank on the left then go up the field to another gateway on your left. Go through the gate and follow a small track through woodland.

  11. You will emerge from the woodland opposite the estate sawmills. Turn left down a concrete slope and then left again along a rough track. You are now at the back of the stables. From here, you can walk down the slope and back into the main gardens and tea-room.

End: Old Kitchen tea-room, grid ref: SS611405

  • Trail: Walking
  • Grade: Moderate
  • Distance: 5 miles (8km)
  • Time: 3 hours
  • OS Map: Explorer OL9
  • Terrain:

    This trail follows footpaths (public rights of way) through the estate, which can be muddy. Fairly easy terrain; one steady and one steep climb.

  • How to get here:

    By foot: From main car park, 200yd, through reception. Admission charges will apply during the property's opening times throughout the year.

    By bike: National Cycle Network Regional Route 56 passes near property

    By bus: TW Coaches 309, Barnstaple-Lynton, infrequent

    By train: Barnstaple, 10 miles (16km)

    By car: 9 miles (14.5km) north-east of Barnstaple, off A39. Postcode for Sat Nav: EX31 4LP

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