Andrew Logan at Buckland Abbey

Andrew Logan with the Universe Throne

It might seem an incongruous pairing: Andrew Logan, flamboyant creator of dazzling artworks fashioned from shattered shards of mirror and urban flotsam, with the seven hundred year old Buckland Abbey, nestling in the bucolic tranquility of the Tavy valley.

However, it is a match made in heaven in which contemporary artist and historical setting each have a surprising amount in common and play with and off each other to their mutual benefit. 

The long and often dramatic history of Buckland offers a rich and evocative context for Logan’s sculpture which in turn animates the ancient, evocative fabric of this former monastery and manor house with a new drama, energy and sense of surprise. 

Andrew Logan with Goldfield
Andrew Logan with Goldfield

Andrew Logan is also all too aware that for nearly a quarter of a millennium Buckland Abbey was a place of devout worship. He has described his sculpture as “a physical manifestation of the spiritual”, and the work eschews a single religious perspective to offer an inclusive world view where faiths and cultures can co-exist and all be celebrated. 

Excalibur
Excalibur

As well as the projection of surface sheen and surrounding detail, Logan equally interprets the notion of reflection as involving deep and serious thought. Alongside the events and surprises at Buckland he has introduced a quieter form of inclusivity which takes the form of a specially designated Contemplation Room. 

Yet again we are welcomed in to Andrew Logan’s infinitely rich and generous art of reflection where boundaries are dissolved and everything and anything is possible.

Andrew Logan with Life and Oomph
Andrew Logan with Life and Oomph