What is the future of our Urban Built Heritage?

Our 10-year strategy outlines how we will ‘play our part’ in helping to look after special places that sit outside of our ownership. The Urban Places Programme has been established to deliver on this part of the strategy by helping others secure their local greenspaces and heritage as they face increasing threats.

We’ve focussed specifically on ‘urban’ because 80% of the UK population live in towns or cities, and that’s forecast to grow to over 90% by 2030.

We have recently launched the Future Parks Accelerator, an initiative that will help secure the future of everyday local parks as we understand the vital role green spaces play in our lives.

 Additionally we’ve been working with a wide range of partners, helping in a practical way on the ground, but also learning and understanding the different challenges and opportunities we face to protect our urban built heritage.

Aerial photo overlooking Leeds City Centre
Aerial photo overlooking Leeds City Centre
Aerial photo overlooking Leeds City Centre

This new research provides an evidence base around urban heritage, and in particular the threats to Grade II listed buildings with potential for public value. It also assesses the trends and challenges around work to sustain urban heritage projects, reviewing relevant current policies and programmes to pinpoint strengths, gaps and weaknesses. The research provides a guide to our Urban Places Strategy and our Future Parks Programme, which sets out to work with a number of local authorities and the National Lottery Heritage Fund (NHLF) to help transform the way parks and green spaces are funded and managed to make sure they are available and accessible for everyone to enjoy, for generations to come.”

City of Plymouth skyline

Download the full Urban Heritage report 

Find out how we will play our part in helping to look after special places that sit outside of our ownership in our Urban Heritage report.