White magic in February

Snowdrops growing in a National Trust garden

As winter turns to spring take a self-guided walk through glorious displays of snowdrops at many of our places. The first sight of the bright white nodding heads of snowdrops peeping through the undergrowth is like a breath of fresh air and a sign that winter is coming to an end.

The white, bell-shaped flowers are always welcome in the garden in the bleak days of February. Not only are they brave enough to cope with whatever the weather throws at them, but they are also the masters of subtlety. Their blue-grey spears perforate the damp earth, and their shoots expand to release their delicate, dangling green and white bells.  

Snowdrops are very hardy and the colder weather, the longer the flowers last, with some flowering in March. 

Snowdrop walks

Come and meet these courageous little flowers and enjoy an invigorating walk around Springhill. Then treat yourself to a hot drink in Springhill’s Servants’ Hall tea-room; snug, warm and full of home baked produce. You can also find out everything you need to know about these intrepid little flowers with Snowdrop Talks from our gardening experts at Springhill on 7, 21 and 28 February (booking essential).

See if you can spot snowdrops as they blossom along the winding paths at Castle Ward. Pack a picnic and bring the kids for some fun in our adventure and woodland playgrounds.

Bundle up and venture out to Downhill Demesne. The gardens at Bishop’s Gate offer a fantastic  spectacle with the lower glen and banks of the bog garden carpeted in a profusion of snowdrops.      

Snowdrops stand for so many concepts, from purity and simplicity, to hope and fortitude. So join us at Rowallane Garden where you can spot them in all their glory and find your own inspiration.   

Snowdrops, or Galanthus, to give them their correct name, are the classic winter flowering plant, loved by everyone. Experience nature’s new beginnings with a refreshing snowdrop stroll – check out our other gardens and woodlands near you for white floral displays.

When the snowdrops flower, can spring be far behind?