Top spots for snowdrops in the North of England

Snowdrops are one of the first signs of life in gardens after the long winter months and a welcome sign that spring will soon be on its way. Here are some of the best places for snowdrops in the North of England – from stunning riverside and woodland displays to Britain’s largest winter garden.

Visitors enjoying the garden in summer at Wordsworth House and Garden

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A close up picture of snowdrops at Dunham Massey, Cheshire

Dunham Massey, Cheshire  

The seven-acre winter garden at Dunham Massey is the largest of its kind in Britain. Since the garden opened in 2009, over 200,000 double and single snowdrops have been planted, which now create a shimmering carpet of white from late December to early February. The garden contains almost 700 different plant species, including 20,000 narcissi that will also be in bloom in early spring.

A couple walking past a snowdrop covered banking towards Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey & Studley Royal, Yorkshire  

This World Heritage Site is a paradise for outdoor and nature lovers. Snowdrop displays are a legacy left by Earl de Grey who planted the flowers along the banks of the River Skell when he owned the estate during the 19th century. There are miles of footpaths and trails to explore and whichever walking route you choose, you’ll find beautiful views. Early spring is the perfect time to explore this amazing place and the surrounding countryside.

Snowdrops in flower with the house in the background at Wallington

Wallington, Northumberland 

Look out for drifts of delicate white snowdrops blooming in the woodland around Wallington - there are hundreds of thousands to spot, including some unusual varieties. Keep your eyes peeled for the carpet of colourful crocuses that bloom on the lawns in the walled garden too.

Beningbrough Hall ha-ha walk carpeted in snowdrops

Beningbrough Hall, Gallery & Gardens, York 

Did you know that there are over 300,000 spring bulbs planted along the south ha-ha? As winter turns to spring this beautiful spot just beyond the walled garden boasts first a white carpet of snowdrops, followed by a bright yellow swathe of daffodils. There are three types to see at Beningbrough - Tete a Tete, Toto and Pheasant's Eye - see if you can spot them or do ask one of our gardeners to help you find the different varieties.

Snowdrops growing in the garden.

Quarry Bank, Cheshire  

Wander beside the meandering river in the ornamental garden created by Robert Hyde Greg in the 1860s, and spot the snowdrops popping up in front of Quarry Bank House where the mill owners lived. You’ll find snowdrops in the orchard beside the Apprentice House too, which have been lovingly tended to over the years by one of the volunteers, and there’ll be thousands more being planted in Chapel Woods during January and February.

Cluster of snowdrops in the borders along the front lawn

Ormesby Hall, Teesside  

Just over two years ago, 8,000 bulbs were planted in the garden at Ormesby Hall. They'll emerge as winter moves into spring so first you can look out for the white sheen of 2,000 snowdrops, followed by the purple of 2,000 crocus under the copper beech tree. As spring gets closer you can enjoy the bright and bold colours from daffodils and tulips in the flower beds.

Snowdrops

Sizergh, Cumbria

Discover a winter walk filled with scent and colour at Sizergh, alongside the magnificent stumpery garden, the home of evergreen ferns and spring flowering bulbs. Head to The Knoll in the woodland garden for the first glimmers of spring from delicate winter aconites and snowdrops to colourful bluebells and wood anenomes.

Snowdrops in the woodland at Nostell

Nostell, Yorkshire

The Pleasure Grounds at Nostell come to life in spring with snowdrops popping up in the landscape. Follow the circular path through the woodland of sweet chestnuts and oaks, making your way towards the Lower Lake and Boat House. As you make your way back up to the Middle Lake, look out for the cascade flowing over the stone Druid’s Bridge.