Spring walks at Waddesdon

See the garden wake from its winter sleep with our variety of spring walks and enjoy the visual feast of 350,000 new bulbs flower for the first time.

Following the planting of an extra 120,000 snowdrops, 32,000 tulips and 25,000 crocus, Waddesdon’s gardens will be almost unrecognisable this spring. From February, a mass swathe of snowdrops will guide visitors around from the House to the Rose Garden, while primroses and cowslip will supply welcome bursts of colour elsewhere.

See swathes of snowdrops in the gardens in February at Waddesdon
Snowdrops in the gardens at Waddesdon, a National Trust property in Buckinghamshire
See swathes of snowdrops in the gardens in February at Waddesdon

Nearly 40,000 plants will be used to recreate the Victorian splendor guests would have enjoyed in Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild’s time, with Head Gardener Mike Buffin drawing on archive records to inspire the formal bedding displays. Around the grounds each area will have its own colour scheme; the Parterre will be a bold mix of blues and purples, with the scroll beds and outer beds featuring a river of Muscari aucheri ‘Blue Magic’ and Crocus.

After soaking up the colour of the parterre, why not follow in the footsteps of Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild along Baron’s Walk? A route that takes you through woodland, past beautiful artworks and gives you views of the wider estate.

Detail of the Apollo Belvedere sculpture in the grounds at Waddesdon Manor, a National Trust property in Buckinghamshire
Walking trail

Baron's Walk 

Follow in the footsteps of Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild on this route that takes you through woodland, past beautiful artworks and gives you views of the wider estate.

Discover a more subtle scheme of pastel whites, purples and pinks along the North Avenue, perfectly complementing the Manor exterior. Here you will see the ‘star’ of the show, our Bellis ‘Medicis Red’ and Bellis ‘Medicis Rose’, which will, quite literally, be planted in the shape of a star. Why not continue towards the fountain and take part in our Wellie Walk?

Enjoy winter walks at Waddesdon Manor, a National Trust property in Buckinghamshire
Walking trail

Wellie Walk 

Take in some of Waddesdon's key sights from the Stables, Manor, artworks and woodland down Miss Alice's Drive. So pull on your wellies and explore.

Witness the birth of spring especially through our winter garden walk, that showcases a blooming carpet of yellow in our wider grounds. Walk to Daffodil Valley, Tay Bridge and Tulip Patch where you will see lots of different varieties of daffodil as they begin to open up to the sun. You will also experience an exciting addition to this walk, as for the first time, 32,000 newly planted tulips will bloom down Tulip Patch. 

Winter Garden at Waddesdon Manor, a National Trust property in Buckinghamshire
Walking trail

Winter Garden Walk 

Stroll through Waddesdon's gardens and soak up the spectacular views. You'll pass different highlights of the garden including the Parterre, Aviary, Wildflower Valley, Winter Garden and the Manor.

You can also bring your dog along for all our spring walks. They are allowed anywhere in the grounds with the exception of the Aviary, Parterre and Woodland Playground. To help protect our beautiful surroundings we just ask that you keep your dog on a short lead and stick to our doggy do’s and don’ts.

Dogs at Waddesdon Manor, a National Trust property in Buckinghamshire

Bringing your dog to Waddesdon

We know that dogs are part of the family so we allow dogs into the grounds so all the family can enjoy a day out together.

Daffodils and scillas in the grounds of Waddesdon Manor, Buckinghamshire

Spring in the garden at Waddesdon Manor

Washes of colour fill the garden at this time of year, with the parterre predominantly blue and purple. In late May our gardeners begin the summer bedding changeover so expect stunning displays.

Flowers in a meadow at Waddesdon Manor, a National Trust property in Buckinghamshire.

Why Waddesdon's not mowing

You may have noticed that some areas of grass around the grounds have been left to grow significantly longer than normal. This is part of our strategy to increase wildlife diversity in the garden.