50 things activities to do in your back garden

While we can’t explore the world outside in the way that we used to, our gardens can be amazing places to discover wildlife and experience nature. There’s so much for you to do on your doorstep: look for shooting stars, make a wild crown, get to know colourful birds or watch furry caterpillars. You can even help the animals who come to visit by building them a new home. Here are our top '50 things to do before you're 11¾' ideas for embracing nature in your own back garden.

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Four nature activities to do at home or in the garden

Your back garden can be a natural playground for you to explore. Check out some ideas for 50 things to do before you’re 11¾ in your own back garden. Who knows what adventures you might get up to? You can also try out lots of ideas in our selection below.

Camping outdoors can be really fun, especially in your back garden where you can get closer to nature just outside your door.

No. 3 camp outdoors

Your back garden can become a place for a wild adventure when you pitch a tent and keep an eye out for animals. The best thing about camping in your back garden is that you can be surrounded by nature whenever you like. Fall asleep to the tune of bats and owls as they go about their night activities. Sleep under the stars and try and spot a constellation.

Visitors making daisy chains in the garden at Clandon Park, Surrey

No. 16 wear a wild crown

Your imagination is the limit when it comes to creating your wild crown. Twigs, daisy chains, leaves, flowers, blossom, grass and other wild materials found in your back garden can be woven and fixed together to create a masterpiece for you to feel proud of wearing. Why not create a crown for a character? Make a fairy crown from daisies and dandelions. Or a woodland wizard could sport a crown made from twigs and colourful leaves. You’ll find lots of natural materials in your garden to get creative with.

 Looking for fairy doors in woodland at Hatchlands Park, Surrey

No. 25 join nature's band

A blade of grass makes an amazing noise when you know what to do with it. A couple of stones and a tree stump can double as a wild drum. Have you ever stopped to quietly notice what sounds nature makes in your garden? Birds singing make a beautiful dawn chorus, and even the sounds of footsteps on the lawn or garden path can make great percussion noises when you dance around in the sunshine.

Night sky

No. 27 go stargazing

It’s not often that we take the time to stargaze, but when you do, you’ll create twinkling memories that last a lifetime. On a clear night you can make a wish on a shooting star or spot a planet from your garden. The night sky is full of spectacular sights whatever time of year it is. You'll need warm clothes and some patience, though – but if you camp outside, this is easy to achieve. The night sky is also constantly changing and will look different from one evening to the next. You might notice something new the next time you admire the magical blanket of stars above.

Bug hunting at Flatford

No. 31 make friends with a bug

Your garden is a great place to look for all sorts of bugs – try searching under rocks and stones, in the soil or the grass. Looking for bugs is fun, because some are so fast that you may need to chase them a little. Does your critter have fur, wings or many legs? Remember to put any creepy-crawlies back where you found them afterwards because they can be delicate and appreciate the home they’re already in: your back garden.

Pallets and pipes stacked up to create bug hotel

No. 36 make a home for wildlife

All sorts of animals need homes, so why not try making a bug hotel, a house for a hedgehog, or even a motel for a mouse? Think about the creature you're making a home for – does it need to be warm, light, dry, dark, cold, or wet? Don’t despair if animals don’t move in straight away. Many will take time to get used to a new place, so check back each day or week to see if any new friends have moved in.

Two birds on a bird feeder

No. 44 watch a bird

Watch birds fly, sing, chat to each other and eat their food by finding somewhere quiet to sit, watch and wait. Just make sure you don't frighten them off, birds get spooked pretty easily. See how many you can spot – maybe you could create a birdspotting diary that you update with the time of day and where you spotted the bird in your garden. You could be surprised by how many types of birds come to visit.