Chestnut fencing

Shaving brace used for fence work

During summer 2018 we be renewed the fence-line between the courtyard and the meadow towards five ponds wood. Traditional techniques and wood felled from the estate were used to create the new fence and gate.

Over the course of summer 2018, a length of fence line adjacent to the Fyne Court courtyard was re-instated. Replacing this fence allowed us to make access into the courtyard from the purple trail easier, following a flatter route across the fields.

Traditional techniques

The fence line was reinstated by staff and volunteers working in partnership with a green woodworker (Little Acorn furniture), using a traditional cleft chestnut design. The fence gives a more rustic, historic feel to the view down the valley, and also allowed our staff and volunteers to learn new, traditional skills, helping to keep these dying crafts alive.

Rangers cleaving timber
Rangers cleaving timber
Rangers cleaving timber

Think local

An additional benefit of the new fence, is that it is made from timber grown on site at Fyne Court. Felling the sweet chestnut trees to provide the timber does not kill them, and the stumps will regrow, slowly establishing an area of sweet chestnut coppice. This allows for more sustainable management of our woodland for a greater range of species.

Using a side axe to form tenon
Using a side axe to form tenon
Using a side axe to form tenon