Keeping the legacy of Beatrix Potter alive

 A view of Hill Top, Cumbria, home of Beatrix Potter

The children's author Beatrix Potter was inspired by nature, wildlife and countryside. We work with her publisher, Frederick Warne & Co Ltd, to protect the land, farms and cottages she gave to the National Trust. This includes her beloved home Hill Top, which still holds some of her most treasured belongings.

This partnership is strengthened by our shared interest in the life and works of Beatrix Potter and a commitment to continuing to look after and protect the countryside she loved.

The writer's passion for the natural world greatly influenced her work and Frederick Warne was the publisher of her books, including the world-famous animal series, which began with The Tale of Peter Rabbit.

Author donated 4,000 acres to the Trust in 1943
Author donated 4,000 acres to the Trust in 1943
Author donated 4,000 acres to the Trust in 1943

'Beatrix understood the importance of preserving the countryside that inspired her writing,' said Susan Bolsover, Licensing and Consumer Products Director, Penguin Ventures (for Frederick Warne, which is part of Penguin Random House). 

'Today Frederick Warne continues to work closely with the National Trust to ensure Beatrix Potter's legacy is preserved for future generations.' 

" Beatrix understood the importance of preserving the countryside that inspired her writing."
- Susan Bolsover, Licensing and Consumer Products Director, Penguin Ventures for Frederick Warne

The Peter Rabbit books were a massive success, and are still published today, almost 120 years after the first edition. Beatrix used much of the money she earned to buy up property and farmland in the Lake District to prevent it from being built on. After her marriage to William Heelis in 1913, she spent the last 30 years of her life in the area working as a farmer and land conservationist. When Beatrix died in December 1943 she left 4,000 acres of land to the National Trust, including 15 farms, cottages, flocks of Herdwick sheep and some areas of outstanding beauty. 

To this end, Frederick Warne supports us in continuing vital conservation work on our Beatrix Potter collection and in making Hill Top farm even more special for visitors. The publisher also helps us to fund projects to look after the other farms she left in our care, including Yew Tree Farm in Coniston, a filming location for Miss Potter the movie; Wray Castle, where Beatrix stayed on her trip to the Lakes in 1882; and Tarn Hows, home to rare-breed Belted Calloway cattle and Herdwick sheep.  

Keeping the legacy alive