The Doll's House at Uppark

Visitors looking at dolls' house at Uppark

Dating from between 1735 and 1740 the doll's house at Uppark has been described as one the two most important British doll's houses that have survived from that era.


The doll's house was built for the Lethieullier family and was brought to Uppark in 1746 by Sarah Lethieullier on her marriage to Sir Matthew Fetherstonhaugh.

The house has never been remodelled or redecorated and has survived so well because it was never really played with by any children in the family.

One of Uppark's most precious objects - the 18th-century dolls' house
The dolls' house at Uppark

The below stairs rooms, including an upper servants’ dining room and the housekeeper’s room, are equipped with all the furniture and utensils which would be found in the servants' quarters such as original pewter plates and tea tray. 

Close up of the servants' quarters in the dolls' house at Uppark
Close up of the servants' rooms in the dolls' house at Uppark

The rooms on the two main floors are loftier and more richly furnished, befitting their higher status for use by the owners of the house. There are richly dressed four poster beds on the top floor, a lavish drawing room complete with tiny mirrors and a real silver tea set and a ‘lying-in’ room with mother and baby dolls.

The principle bedroom in the dolls' house at Uppark
The principle bedroom in the dolls' house at Uppark

Not only are the rooms decorated to show the distinction of rank, but the servants are made from wood and the refined ladies, wearing silk dresses, are made from wax.