The Rose Garden at Greys Court

Dark red rose climbing on the Cromwellian building

The Rose garden bursts into vibrant colour in June. There are wonderful scents and sights to explore through the iron gates and wooden doors of the walled garden.

History

The gardens at Greys Court were virtually derelict when the Brunner family arrived in 1937. Lady Brunner was keen to create a haven of peace of tranquillity within the walled gardens, using the walls that were already there to create a series of ‘rooms’ that you could wander through.

Lady Brunner came from a theatrical background and she was interested in creating a feeling of intrigue for visitors at what they might find through the next door.

One of these ‘rooms’ is the Rose Garden, which traces the history of the rose from the early damask varieties to the modern hybrid perennials.

Types of Roses

There are older varieties of roses around the lawn area. Sweet-scented varieties such as the rosa Queen of Denmark have a comforting old-fashioned rose fragrance that transports you back to drowsy days of summers past. Near the 12th century wall, the one with the little gate in it, there are more modern varieties such as the pink and red candy-striped rosa Ferdinand Pilchard.

Other places to spot Roses

Rambling roses climb up the stonework of the mansion. At the entrance to the house look out for the climbing rose ‘Desprez a Fleur Jaune’ and the shrub rose ‘Lady Emma Hamilton’. Both roses are sweetly scented and bloom a wonderful orange-yellow.

Lining the path from the Kitchen garden to the wooden statue of a former much-loved Head Gardener is one of the oldest varieties of roses, the Rosamundi. The path is a treat to walk along in June when the double-hedge is heavy with blooms.

Buy them in the shop

Some of the roses that are growing in the gardens are available to buy from the shop. If you make your way down to the Woodshed shop, you could purchase a plant and recreate your own little corner of Greys Court's rose garden in your garden at home.

The gardens are more peaceful if you visit mid-week. Plus you can enjoy a free regular tea or coffee with any purchase from the Cowshed tea-room mid-week throughout June. (Weekends not included, normal admission applies.)