Who saved the Hall?

Chapel stained glass window dedicated to Bishop Abraham

Elizabeth Moreton (1821 - 1912) was a wealthy woman and inherited Little Moreton Hall relatively late in life. She was a member of the Clewer House of Mercy, which was a group of Sisters working to rescue ‘fallen women’ in the notorious slums of Clewer near Windsor. Her strong religious and moral conviction led her to take a keen interest in saving her ancestral home.

One of her main feats was installing metal tie rods in the Long Gallery, which stabilised the South Range. Another focal point of her restoration was the Chapel, which had seen incredible neglect in the previous decades. We have Elizabeth’s Bible on display in the Chapel for visitors to see.

Elizabeth bequeathed the hall to her cousin, Reverend Charles Thomas Abraham who was to become Suffragan Bishop of Derby. Like her, Bishop Abraham was deeply committed to the hall’s survival and restoration, but it soon became beyond his means. In 1937, he offered the Hall to the National Trust and, following a public appeal to raise the necessary funds, it was handed over in 1938. The Chapel’s stained glass window is dedicated to the Bishop.

The Chapel at the hall is still a dedicated chapel and services are held on most Sundays during the main season.

 

The Chapel at Little Moreton Hall
The Chapel at Little Moreton Hall
The Chapel at Little Moreton Hall